Instructors teach Army, life lessons through Air Assault School rigors

By MARTHA C. KOESTER
NCO Journal

It’s called the 10 toughest days in the Army, and nobody knows the challenges of the celebrated Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky., better than its NCO instructors.

“It’s a very proud feeling being an NCO instructor. But it’s also a lot of pressure,” said instructor Staff Sgt. Donald Davenport. “You always have to be on top of your game because we are the focal point of the 101stAirborne Division. It takes a lot of composure and perseverance to be at the top of your game, day in and day out.

“We are limited on mistakes as NCOs. We have to be the most professional at all times. Yes, everyone slips, but the group of instructors we have here I would definitely say are the most professional NCOs I have worked with in my career.”

The Sabalauski Air Assault School is a U.S. Army Forces Command unit that trains Soldiers assigned to the 101st Airborne Division, other Army units and FORSCOM service members. Courses offered at the school include rappel master training, fast rope insertion/
extraction (FRIES), special purpose insertion/extraction (SPIES) and Pathfinder training.

Though air assault training is offered at other Army installations, Fort Campbell’s school was the original.

Pvt. Nathan Purdy, center, B Company, 526th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, tests his Swiss seat technique while rappelling at the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky. (Photo by Sgt. Keith Rogers, U.S. Army)
Pvt. Nathan Purdy, center, B Company, 526th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, tests his Swiss seat technique while rappelling at the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky. (Photo by Sgt. Keith Rogers, U.S. Army)

“We [emphasize] here at the schoolhouse [to] every air assault student that is stationed at Fort Campbell that this is a job requirement here,” said Sgt. 1st Class William McBride, chief instructor. “In order to [be successful] at Fort Campbell, you must be air-assault qualified. You have to have that drive and determination to earn that Air Assault Badge in order to work here and to lead Soldiers in this division.”

Earning the coveted Air Assault Badge is dependent on discipline. Attention to detail will bring students success, but rank will win them no favors from Day 0 to Day 10 of training, instructors said.

“From the lowest-ranked private to the top general, we have all ranks come through Air Assault School,” McBride said. “They all get the same disciplinary treatment. We don’t care what their job is … we don’t care who they know. They are in an Army school. Discipline has to be enforced on everyone. [Students] are told to get in formation, they are told to march, they are told to sound off. That happens with everyone, regardless of their rank.”

Perhaps no Soldier illustrates this point better than recent graduate Col. Michael W. Minor, the commander of the 101st Airborne Division rear detachment, who graduated air assault training in June 2013 alongside his son, Cadet Isaac A. Minor, a student at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise.

“They were treated the same, just like everyone else,” said Staff Sgt. Zilvinas Lapelis, a senior instructor. “It’s amazing because [Col. Minor] is a leader and his son is just another Soldier, following in his father’s footsteps.

“The big picture is [Soldiers] following leadership’s footsteps. It’s imperative. As a leader, you have to be air-assault qualified if you are going to expect your Soldiers to go to Air Assault School. … We expect [leaders] to come here and earn the coveted Air Assault Badge.”

Back to school

With the drawing down of forces in Afghanistan comes a renewed focus on the 10 toughest days in the Army at the Sabalauski Air Assault School and on what an air assault Soldier is.

“I have only been here for about a year, but I have seen the changes in the Soldiers’ state of mind from, ‘It’s just Air Assault School’ to ‘We need to really train for this,’” said Sgt. 1st Class Richard Santana, a senior instructor. “I have heard, ‘It’s just another badge,’ and that’s how a lot of people look at it.

“We emphasize the basic structures now, the discipline, the need for this air assault course or even the badge. Now, people are actually trying to train up for it versus just being told, ‘Go.’”

As leaders encourage their Soldiers to undergo air-assault training, instructors are seeing more Soldiers eager to be a part of the legacy of the 101st Airborne Division. Growth is evident around the school, instructors said.

“Four years ago, we only had two air assault training teams here,” Lapelis said. “Now, we have four. We are producing over 3,000 Soldiers annually who earn their coveted Air Assault Badges. So on a daily basis, when all four teams are active at the same time, we have almost 1,000 Soldiers on the school grounds.”

“What I try to preach to these students is to take advantage of us in your own backyard because a lot of other units in other places do not have these advantages,” Davenport said. “You are given an opportunity to go to Air Assault School and earn something that not everybody in the Army has.

“The training here is mission-essential, but it is something you take with you throughout the rest of your military career. … You depend on those Soldiers who have that fortitude, attention to detail and discipline, who you can lean on when times get tough. You know they are going to carry out the mission to make sure it’s a success. That’s what I think this schoolhouse teaches: success in the future and dependability.”

School of life

Enduring the school’s mental and physical challenges will prove valuable throughout a Soldier’s military career, instructors say.

“How you train is how you fight,” Lapelis said. “If you don’t know what the right thing is and you’re constantly doing something that’s not right, that can possibly hurt someone. You keep doing that long enough, it becomes muscle memory. In garrison, it is forgiving. Downrange, it is unforgiving.”

“It’s the relationships you develop and the things you can take with you,” Davenport said. “Attention to detail and looking at things in a different light as far as safety ─ you’re always looking out for that guy beside you or thinking ahead. All those things will make you successful later on in life.

“Some people will never do an air assault operation in their life. Some people will never sling-load equipment. Some people will never fast-rope or rappel out of an aircraft. But it’s those experiences that you can take with you ─ that you can overcome obstacles and you can actually succeed.”

However, some of those obstacles students face during the training can ultimately lead to a Soldier’s undoing at the school.

“We had 214 [Soldiers start the course] recently,” Davenport said. “I made it a point to tell the 162 at the end of [Day 0], ‘Do you realize what you did? Out of 214, you are what remains. That should make some type of fire burn in you that you can do this. Today, you are better than [those who did not make it]. Continue to be better; finish strong.’”

Soldiers who fail to complete the training often try again. Instructors said they see many familiar faces in class.

“We see them when they come through ─ ‘Oh you were here last class or two classes ago,’” Davenport said. “We see where they are progressively getting better, but they are just having a hard time, whether it’s academics or physical. But it’s a learning tool. They know what to expect; they know what is expected of them.

“We had a Day 0 student who had been through this course eight times, but yesterday was the student’s day [to succeed]. … It was the determination of this student who did not give up that will stick with her for the rest of her life. She is going to look back and say, ‘I can do this.’”

“They can come back as many times as they want,” McBride said. “I will keep helping them through it.”

Long hours

Instructors at the Sabalauski Air Assault School take their jobs as mentors seriously and exhibit a passion to help the students and school by taking on a grueling schedule, particularly if students need extra assistance.

“If I have a [candidate who wants to work as an instructor] say, ‘Oh, I’m just going to teach my class and go home,’ it doesn’t work that way,” chief instructor McBride said. “[What] I am looking for is an instructor who says, ‘Hey, I belong in the best division in the world, and there is a problem in my unit ─ they don’t have enough air-assault qualified individuals. I’m here to fix that.’ Absolutely, I want to see that drive and determination for the students.”

Davenport agreed. Teaching at the Air Assault School is not the best place to go to get out of doing another job.

“This is a 24-hour-a-day, it’s-always-on-your-mind job,” he said. “You’re always involved. You need to be flexible with things that are going on. It’s a huge mentorship role. Huge.”

“You’re constantly trying to adapt to the situation,” Santana said. “So there’s really no time for you to relax, especially when you have a lot of civilian priorities as well, like I go to college. It’s tough, and it’s just constant. Every 10 days, you train these Soldiers from Day 0 to Day 10. You get them to where you want them to be, and then they graduate. They’re gone; then you start all over.”

Hard training

The Air Assault School is widely known for the difficulty of the course, and instructors acknowledge it is not for the faint of heart.

Soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) practice sling-load operations at the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky. The course helps Soldiers further develop physical and mental discipline as they learn sling-load operations, rappelling and fast-rope techniques. (Photo by Spc. Jennifer Andersson, U.S. Army)
Soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) practice sling-load operations at the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky. The course helps Soldiers further develop physical and mental discipline as they learn sling-load operations, rappelling and fast-rope techniques. (Photo by Spc. Jennifer Andersson, U.S. Army)

“It is constant training, constant,” McBride said. “Every minute of the student’s time is managed. We give them every opportunity to succeed through directional guidance. … It’s so vital that we as instructors have the best period of instruction for the students, so that when they earn that badge and go to their units, they still have the knowledge to be a vital asset. The training is intense ─ from the physical training to the knowledge and in a short period of time.”

“It’s not just going to Air Assault School to get smoked and get more physical training,” Davenport said. “It’s coming down here to earn a badge that a lot of people will never have the opportunity to achieve in a lifetime.”

McBride said the value of air assault training was made apparent to him while on a recent deployment to Afghanistan. McBride was asked to assist a unit in rigging an A-22 cargo bag, something he hadn’t done for years since attending the Air Assault School.

“I had an entire platoon full of air-assault qualified privates, specialists, E-5s, E-6s who said, ‘Hey platoon sergeant, we’ve got this,’” McBride said. “That’s the value of this training. That’s what made me proud to be in this division, and that’s why I love working here at this schoolhouse ─ because I have that impact on thousands of Soldiers in this division.”

The training is difficult, but it isn’t designed to be impossible to accomplish, Lapelis said.

“It’s extremely feasible. But it’s up to that Soldier, up to that individual, to apply that effort, that dedication,” he said.

Instructors point to another recent graduate who garnered national media attention for his successful completion of the grueling course. Sgt. 1st Class Greg Robinson, a combat engineer with A Company, 2nd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, lost a portion of his lower right leg during a mission in Kandahar, Afghanistan, in October 2006.  Robinson became the first Soldier with an amputated limb and prosthetic to graduate from the Sabalauski Air Assault School in April 2013.

“He is an amputee,” Lapelis said. “[But he faced the] same standard, same grueling tasks. He got through the school. … [Robinson] executed every obstacle to the standard, conducted his 2-mile run, 6-mile [road marches], 12-mile [road marches]. He’s living proof that anyone can get through the school. It is possible.

“It takes a lot of heart, a lot of dedication, a lot of intestinal fortitude. That shows right there that throughout not just the Army, but the military overall, that it can be done. You just have to apply yourself.”

NCO’s quick actions saved lives after grenade toss went wrong

By JEFF CRAWLEY
Fort Sill Cannoneer

Staff Sgt. Jon King, C Company, 434th Field Artillery Detachment, is being hailed as a hero for removing a live grenade from a throwing pit April 14 at Fort Sill, Okla., after a trainee’s hand grenade toss bounced off a wall and landed at his own feet.

“It was very heroic and brave. He definitely did the right thing,” said Sgt. 1st Class Dwayne Kimmel, noncommissioned officer in charge of the hand grenade range. “His training definitely paid off.”

BCT Soldiers from D Battery, 1st Battalion, 31st Field Artillery were getting their hand grenade training at the Sgt. 1st Class Tony Burris Hand Grenade Complex during their fifth week of training when the incident occurred.

In Pit No. 1, when the trainee threw his first live grenade it hit the open pit’s front wall and bounced to the ground. Instead of immediately exiting the pit as per safety procedures, the trainee looked at the grenade, fell to the ground and just froze, said King, who has 18 years in the Army.

Staff Sgt. Jon King, C Company, 434th Field Artillery Detachment, explains how a Basic Combat Training Soldier improperly threw a hand grenade to a KSWO-TV news crew April 18, 2014, at the Sgt. 1st Class Tony Burris Hand Grenade Complex at Fort Sill, Okla. (Photo by Jeff Crawley, Fort Sill Cannoneer)
Staff Sgt. Jon King, C Company, 434th Field Artillery Detachment, explains how a Basic Combat Training Soldier improperly threw a hand grenade to a KSWO-TV news crew April 18, 2014, at the Sgt. 1st Class Tony Burris Hand Grenade Complex at Fort Sill, Okla. (Photo by Jeff Crawley, Fort Sill Cannoneer)

King, who was in the pit with the Soldier, realized he couldn’t get the trainee out of the pit in time so he went for the grenade.

“Once I reached for the grenade it hit my foot, bounced behind me between my legs … so I went for the grenade (again) and threw it out of the pit as fast as I could,” King said. It exploded just outside the bunker-like pit.

“I think it was just pure instinct from several deployments,” King said of his actions.

The M67 fragmentation grenade has a kill radius of 5 meters, wounding radius of 15 meters and shrapnel-producing radius of 230 meters, King said. It has a six-second fuse, but the instructors train for a 3- to 5-second detonation.

Although the BCT Soldier and King wore body armor, if the grenade had exploded inside the pit “there would have been loss of life for sure,” said Kimmel, who is King’s supervisor.

Instead of drill sergeants, who oversee training elsewhere, staff, known as cadre, from the C/434th FA Det., run specialized areas of BCT. Those areas include gas chamber and obstacle course training, and the towers on the rifle ranges, said Capt. John O’Brien, C/434th FA Det. commander. They also perform the hand grenade instruction. King an infantryman, who has been at Fort Sill for three years, was one of the grenade instructors.

The trainees get instruction on throwing grenades as well as what to do if a grenade doesn’t clear the pit. The protocol is for the BCT Soldier not to pick up the dropped grenade, but to immediately exit the pit, and get on the other side of the pit wall and lay down flat.

The cadre member makes an attempt to get to the grenade and if they can’t, they get out of the pit, too, and land on top of the Soldier, covering him or her from the blast.

“We show them how to get out of the pit and what their safety position is,” King said.

BCT Soldiers first throw four training grenades, and then two live M67 fragmentation grenades. Inside the pit with the trainee, the instructor keeps his eye on the grenade at all times, King said.

Kimmel described King as a knowledgeable, calm instructor.

“He takes his time to teach the Soldiers, and if they make mistakes he will stop training so they understand what they did wrong,” Kimmel said.

That’s what King did after a few loud words with the trainee after the mishap.

“I re-explained the throwing procedures to the Soldier and had him throw his second grenade,” King said.

King also spoke to the trainee the next day to ensure he understood just how dangerous the situation had been.

“I told him there was no bad blood between us,” King said.

King called his wife, Andrea, and told her what happened. He said her reaction was, “What!?” and “This is why you guys should have hazard (duty) pay.”

King’s said his co-workers made comments like, “Thank God, you’re alive” and “That would have sucked because you just made the promotion list, and the next day you almost died.”

King emphasized that training incidents like this are rare at Fort Sill. The last one similar to this happened about four years ago. He said the incident will probably be incorporated into the 434th FA Detachment’s training instruction.

For his courageous actions, King is being recommended for a lifesaving award.

“The bravery and heroism that he displayed was phenomenal,” O’Brien said.

Former drill sergeants invited to attend 50th anniversary events

By JONATHAN (JAY) KOESTER
NCO Journal

NCOs at Fort Jackson, S.C., are organizing what could be a new Soldier’s worst nightmare: a field full of Soldiers wearing drill sergeant hats.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Army’s drill sergeant training program. Events to commemorate that anniversary are planned to coincide with the 2014 Drill Sergeant and Advanced Individual Training Platoon Sergeant of the Year competition Sept. 8-13 at Fort Jackson. All former drill sergeants — retired and currently serving — are invited to attend the competition and commemoration.

The competition will take place Sept. 8-10, with the competition winners announced during an awards ceremony Sept. 11. On Sept. 12, there will be an open house at the new U.S. Army Drill Sergeant School campus, as well as a social, said Sgt. Maj. Thomas Campbell, the G3/5/7 (operations/plans/training) sergeant major for the U.S. Army Center for Initial Military Training at Fort Eustis, Va. All former drill sergeants are being asked to wear their drill sergeant hats to the social.

The competitors of the 2011 Drill Sergeant of the Year Competition stand in front of the U.S. Army Drill Sergeant School at Fort Jackson, S.C. The statue is of Allen Glen Carpenter, who won the first competition in 1969 as a sergeant first class. (NCO Journal file photo)
The competitors of the 2011 Drill Sergeant of the Year Competition stand in front of the U.S. Army Drill Sergeant School at Fort Jackson, S.C. The statue is of Allen Glen Carpenter, who won the first competition in 1969 as a sergeant first class. (NCO Journal file photo)

“The Drill Sergeant Hat Social is going to be in the center of the Drill Sergeant School campus, in the center of the physical training field,” Campbell said. “Our goal is to get as many drill sergeant hats as we can on the Drill Sergeant School field. We will then have a photo opportunity to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the formal Drill Sergeant School program.”

Countless Soldiers have walked by the drill sergeant statue at Fort Jackson, and the Sept. 12 social offers the chance to watch that statue come to life. Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Allen Glen Carpenter will be the guest speaker at the social. Not only was Carpenter the Army’s first Drill Sergeant of the Year, he is also the person who the drill sergeant statue is modeled after.

“The unique thing is Sgt. Maj. Carpenter has never seen that statue,” Campbell said. “This will be the first time he actually gets to see it in person. It’s always stood in front of the Fort Jackson drill sergeant school, both at the old location and at the new school. So every drill sergeant who has passed through the doors since the 1980s has walked by Sgt. Maj. Carpenter. And many, many photos have been taken by drill sergeants with him.”

For more information on the competition, open house or social, e-mail Campbell at thomas.e.campbell7.mil@mail.mil or the current Drill Sergeant of the Year, Sgt. 1st Class David Stover, at david.e.stover.mil@mail.mil.

Graduates of new SHARP pilot course ready to train advocates, care for victims

By MICHAEL L. LEWIS
NCO Journal

As the Army works to combat sexual harassment and sexual assault within its ranks, it now has more than 30 new weapons at its disposal — the graduates of the Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention schoolhouse pilot course, who completed their two-month program at Fort Belvoir, Va., last month.

A mix of NCOs and Department of the Army civilians, the students studied how to build resilience, identify signs of prejudice and discrimination, investigate incidents, navigate the legal process, take care of victims, and foster a culture of prevention within a command. Thus, they are now the Army’s subject-matter experts in all things SHARP-related and will train sexual assault response coordinators, or SARCs, and victim advocates, or VAs, throughout the Army as part of mobile training teams.

Sgt. 1st Class Charles Daniels, the installation sexual assault response coordinator at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., presents his small group's work to the rest of the class during the new SHARP pilot course at Fort Belvoir, Va., in March. (Photo by Michael L. Lewis)
Sgt. 1st Class Charles Daniels, the installation sexual assault response coordinator at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., presents his small group’s work to the rest of the class during the new SHARP pilot course at Fort Belvoir, Va., in March. (Photo by Michael L. Lewis)

“The intent was to get our experience to assist the development of this two-month course, which will be for newly or less-experienced brigade-level SARCs and program managers, in addition to getting us certified to become MTT trainers,” said Sgt. 1st Class Rena Key, the SHARP program manager for the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, at Fort Bliss, Texas. “It was a double whammy for us. The course content expanded on what we already knew, but then we were provided more information from the higher-level echelons that gave us more technical, in-depth training.”

That people from the highest levels of the Army participated in the training shows how seriously the Army takes the SHARP program, said Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, the Army’s chief of staff, who spoke to the students at their graduation.

“We need to hold people accountable — not just those who committed the crime, but those who do not create [an] environment” of trust, Odierno said. “That’s one of the things we have to work on. That’s one of the things I have to work on. … We have to keep this momentum going and train others.”

In addition to hearing from representatives from the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command and the Office of the Judge Advocate General, the course’s students also benefited from hearing each other’s experiences and ideas, said Sgt. 1st Class Corey Cooley, the SHARP program manager for the 15th Sustainment Brigade at Fort Bliss.

“Even though I’ve been a SARC for two years, I’ve grown from this class,” Cooley said. “The lessons learned that have been brought forth have really taught me. I might not ever be in the situations they described, but being able to hear people share those things has been great for me.”

Key also appreciated hearing best practices from her colleagues.

“The nuggets of information we learned when we had conversations about what different people did about training and building awareness at their units, I can take that back and implement it at Fort Bliss, because someone has already done it successfully elsewhere,” she said.

An instructor teaches a class on facilitation techniques during the SHARP pilot course in April. (Photo by Michael L. Lewis)
An instructor teaches a class on facilitation techniques during the SHARP pilot course in April. (Photo by Michael L. Lewis)

The overarching goal for the course was to give students the tools and resources they need to help a victim of sexual assault or sexual harassment, said Master Sgt. Ronald Henry, the SHARP program manager for U.S. Army Europe in Wiesbaden, Germany.

“Some of the classes, initially I thought, ‘I don’t understand how this ties into SHARP,’” Henry said. “My thinking was a little narrow until I refocused on what SHARP is all about in the first place: How can I help a victim? So all the stuff we learned about behavior, personality characteristics — if any of that stuff helps me or enhances me in any way in how I relate to helping a victim, then that was [worthwhile] for me.”

Though the graduates will now train SARCs and VAs throughout the Army, working to eliminate sexual assault and sexual harassment in the Army is everyone’s responsibility, they said.

“Some people think that if you’re a SHARP person, if you’re a VA, if you’re a SARC, or if you’re a trainer, the responsibility for SHARP only lies in that group of people,” Henry said. “But when we talk about building a culture of change, the responsibility has to be on everybody. There are only about 30 in this class, and even if you include all the VAs and SARCs in the Army, we alone won’t effect culture change in the military. It’s going to require every single individual — from Gen. Odierno all the way down to the private who came into the Army yesterday. It’s going to require everybody.”

“It takes all leaders to make it their duty to understand that SHARP violations can happen to anybody,” Key said. “It’s our duty — our duty — to support SHARP. It’s not an option. The well-being of every Soldier is everybody’s responsibility. You don’t have to have a title to take care of people.

“As noncommissioned officers, when you put those chevrons on, you were placed in a leadership position; you were given the authority to lead. With that, you have to expand yourself to understand there are things outside your [military occupational specialty], outside your squad, outside your platoon. We affect the organization as a whole, and so many of us as noncommissioned officers can be the initial change agents. We’re in the middle to help implement the change to take care of Soldiers in reference to sexual harassment and sexual assault, and support those who [are victims]. That’s what we do as noncommissioned officers — we support in every aspect of the word.”

Indeed, the training they’ve gained in the pilot course only augments what NCOs do every day, Henry said.

“One of the things that I was taught when I became a noncommissioned officer was that my primary duty was to take care of Soldiers. I don’t think that message has changed today for young E-5s,” he said. “If, as leaders, it is our job to take care of Soldiers, that just doesn’t mean the Soldiers beneath me, it means all the Soldiers around me. So that means you have to be engaged. Don’t wait for annual training or quarterly training. Educate yourself about trends, tactics, the behaviors of offenders and all those things so you know what to look for in order to take care of your Soldiers.”

 

David Vergun of the Army News Service contributed to this report.

 

TRADOC reassesses NCO education with eye to adaptation

From the Army News Service:

The Army is conducting a complete re-assessment of its NCO education system for the first time since 1976, according to Gen. David G. Perkins, Training and Doctrine Command’s new commander.

Perkins, who assumed command of TRADOC on March 14, spoke at the Army’s Brain Health Consortium on April 10 at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Va.

The ultimate weapon of the U.S. Army in the future must be the brains of its Soldiers, Perkins said.

“We’re banking on our cognitive capability,” Perkins said, describing that as the Army’s “ace in the hole” potential enemies.

“We think kinetically, they can probably buy the same weapons we have,” he said, at least in small numbers. He added there are also armies out there larger than the U.S. Army.

In the past, the U.S. Army has relied upon superior technology, he said, but that “technology gap” is closing fast.

Being able to adapt quickly will be the key in the future, he said. One reason is the uncertainty of today’s operational environment.

Gen. David G. Perkins, commander of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, speaks April 10 at the Army’s Brain Health Consortium at Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Va. (Photo courtesy of Army News Service)
Gen. David G. Perkins, commander of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, speaks April 10 at the Army’s Brain Health Consortium at Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Va. (Photo courtesy of Army News Service)

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