Tag Archives: NCO induction ceremony

204th Military Intelligence Battalion welcomes new NCOs

By MEGHAN PORTILLO
NCO Journal

Surrounded by exhibits depicting the greatness of the NCO Corps through the ages, nine new leaders were welcomed into the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion in an NCO induction ceremony Sept. 8 at the NCO Heritage and Education Center at Fort Bliss, Texas.

The inductees were addressed by guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Richard Tucker, who until his recent retirement was the director for the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
The inductees were addressed by guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Richard Tucker, who until his recent retirement was the director for the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

“These Soldiers have shown they are no longer ‘worker bees.’ They have set themselves apart as professionals,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Ken Bean, command sergeant major of the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. “I’m very proud of the NCOs in our NCO Corps and where they are today. I see them stepping up in a time of turmoil to train and take care of our nation.”

At the start of the ceremony, the inductees were addressed by guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Richard Tucker, who until his recent retirement was the director for the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. He encouraged them to prioritize their education and to take their roles as Army leaders seriously.

Nine new NCOs were inducted into the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion on Thursday during a ceremony at the NCO Heritage Center at Fort Bliss, Texas. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Nine new NCOs were inducted into the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion during a ceremony Sept. 8 at the NCO Heritage and Education Center at Fort Bliss, Texas. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

“People like me, I’m a dinosaur,” Tucker said. “It’s almost time for me to go. As a matter of fact, I walk the stage tomorrow for my retirement ceremony. And right now, I go to sleep every night nice and peaceful, because I know the greatest men and women of this country are protecting me. It’s you guys. You staff sergeants, sergeants first class: You are the future.”

Sgt. Davonte Winn walks under an archway, signifying his transition from junior enlisted Soldier to NCO. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Sgt. Davonte Winn walks under an archway, signifying his transition from junior enlisted Soldier to NCO. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

Following Tucker’s address, the audience joined the inductees in reciting the NCO Creed. Then, three NCOs representing the NCOs of the past, present and future lit three candles displayed behind wooden “N,” “C” and “O” letters. A red candle represented valor, a white candle honor and integrity, and a blue candle vigilance.

As their names were called, the young men and women each walked under a wooden archway signifying their transition from junior enlisted to NCO and then signed their name alongside their command sergeant major’s on their certificate – the “Charge to the Newly Promoted Noncommissioned Officer.” To end the ceremony, the group proudly sang the Army song.

Sgt. Luis Peluyera Rivera, one of the nine inducted during the ceremony, said he is proud of his and his comrades’ accomplishments.

“I feel like I’ve made it. We are the backbone of the Army, and it is great to finally be a part of it,” he said.

The charge to the newly promoted noncommissioned officer, signed by both the NCO and the command sergeant major, states, “I will discharge carefully and diligently the duties of the grade to which I have been promoted and uphold the traditions and standards of the Army. I understand that Soldiers of lesser rank are required to obey my lawful orders. Accordingly, I accept responsibility for their actions. As a noncommissioned officer, I accept the charge to observe and follow the orders and directions given by supervisors acting according to the laws, articles and rules governing the discipline of the Army, I will correct conditions detrimental to the readiness thereof. In so doing, I will fulfill my greatest obligation as a leader and thereby confirm my status as a noncommissioned officer.” (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
The charge to the newly promoted noncommissioned officer, signed by both the NCO and the command sergeant major, states, “I will discharge carefully and diligently the duties of the grade to which I have been promoted and uphold the traditions and standards of the Army. I understand that Soldiers of lesser rank are required to obey my lawful orders. Accordingly, I accept responsibility for their actions. As a noncommissioned officer, I accept the charge to observe and follow the orders and directions given by supervisors acting according to the laws, articles and rules governing the discipline of the Army, I will correct conditions detrimental to the readiness thereof. In so doing, I will fulfill my greatest obligation as a leader and thereby confirm my status as a noncommissioned officer.” (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Three NCOs acting on behalf of NCOs of the past, present and future light three candles. The red candle represents valor, the white honor and integrity, and the blue vigilance. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Three NCOs acting on behalf of NCOs of the past, present and future light three candles. The red candle represents valor, the white honor and integrity, and the blue vigilance. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

Deployed troops enter NCO Corps with rite of passage

 By SGT. TANJIE PATTERSON
3rd Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs

The 3rd Sustainment Brigade partnered with the 311th Sustainment Command  (Expeditionary) to host a noncommissioned officer induction ceremony July 16  at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan.

An NCO induction ceremony is a way to  welcome newly promoted sergeants into the time-honored Corps known as the ‘backbone of the Army,’ and it also showcases the pride that NCOs embody.

During an induction ceremony at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, on July 16, recently promoted sergeants with the 3rd Sustainment Brigade and 311th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) recite the Charge of the Noncommissioned Officer and confirm their new Army leadership status. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Tanjie Patterson, 3rd Sustainment Brigade, Public Affairs)
During an induction ceremony at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan, on July 16, recently promoted sergeants with the 3rd Sustainment Brigade and 311th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) recite the Charge of the Noncommissioned Officer and confirm their new Army leadership status. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Tanjie Patterson, 3rd Sustainment Brigade, Public Affairs)

“The step from Soldier to NCO is a big one,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Ted  Copeland, senior enlisted advisor for the 311th ESC. “It is probably the biggest  step that any of these NCOs will make. It is important to impart to them the  rich traditions and heritage of the Noncommissioned Officer Corps as well as the  pride and expectations that come with the promotion; it’s not about the pay, but  it’s about being a leader now.”

Twenty-four “Providers” were welcomed  into the Corps, including NCOs assigned to the Montana National Guard’s 495th  Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 63rd Ordnance Company, Virginia National  Guard’s 1710th Transportation Ceremony, 135th Quartermaster Company and  Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Sustainment Brigade.

The  ceremony began as Staff Sgt. Jackie Green, HHC, 3rd Sustainment Brigade,  narrated Ruth Apperson Rous’ poem, ‘I Am the Flag,’ while the national colors were posted. Third Sustainment Brigade Senior Enlisted Advisor Command Sgt.  Maj. Forbes Daniels said that the patriotic introduction helped make this  particular induction ceremony unlike any other.

“We didn’t follow the  normal script,” said Daniels. “I wanted to make it interesting, and I wanted it  to have a credible impact, all while preserving tradition.”

Junior  enlisted Soldiers also took part in the ceremony as privates through specialists  proclaimed their willingness to learn from and follow their sergeants by reciting ‘A Soldier’s Request.’

Daniels then led the NCOs through their  rites of passage. With their right hands raised and in a resounding voice, the  sergeants delivered the ‘Charge of the NCO’ and confirmed their new leadership  status.

“I thought the ceremony was awesome,” said newly promoted Sgt.  Cody Ramon, an ammunition specialist with HHC, 3rd Sustainment Brigade and  Lewisville, Texas, native. “It’s a great opportunity that all NCOs should get to  experience. I feel that this ceremony will be one of the highlights in my career  as a noncommissioned officer.”

Sgt. Patrick Agwu, transportation  management coordinator who also recently earned his stripes, said he appreciated  sharing in the experience with his peers.

“I feel like you’re not  officially part of the Corps until you have been part of an induction ceremony,” said Agwu, with HHC, 3rd Sustainment Brigade and native of Wichita, Kan., “and,  I think that all NCOs should be privileged to have this opportunity.”

Copeland said that the newly inducted NCOs are a great example of the future NCO  Corps.

“They all obviously meet the Army standards and have demonstrated  the motivation to carry the Corps forward.”