Tag Archives: NCO Creed

204th Military Intelligence Battalion welcomes new NCOs

By MEGHAN PORTILLO
NCO Journal

Surrounded by exhibits depicting the greatness of the NCO Corps through the ages, nine new leaders were welcomed into the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion in an NCO induction ceremony Sept. 8 at the NCO Heritage and Education Center at Fort Bliss, Texas.

The inductees were addressed by guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Richard Tucker, who until his recent retirement was the director for the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
The inductees were addressed by guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Richard Tucker, who until his recent retirement was the director for the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

“These Soldiers have shown they are no longer ‘worker bees.’ They have set themselves apart as professionals,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Ken Bean, command sergeant major of the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion, 470th Military Intelligence Brigade. “I’m very proud of the NCOs in our NCO Corps and where they are today. I see them stepping up in a time of turmoil to train and take care of our nation.”

At the start of the ceremony, the inductees were addressed by guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Richard Tucker, who until his recent retirement was the director for the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. He encouraged them to prioritize their education and to take their roles as Army leaders seriously.

Nine new NCOs were inducted into the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion on Thursday during a ceremony at the NCO Heritage Center at Fort Bliss, Texas. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Nine new NCOs were inducted into the 204th Military Intelligence Battalion during a ceremony Sept. 8 at the NCO Heritage and Education Center at Fort Bliss, Texas. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

“People like me, I’m a dinosaur,” Tucker said. “It’s almost time for me to go. As a matter of fact, I walk the stage tomorrow for my retirement ceremony. And right now, I go to sleep every night nice and peaceful, because I know the greatest men and women of this country are protecting me. It’s you guys. You staff sergeants, sergeants first class: You are the future.”

Sgt. Davonte Winn walks under an archway, signifying his transition from junior enlisted Soldier to NCO. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Sgt. Davonte Winn walks under an archway, signifying his transition from junior enlisted Soldier to NCO. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

Following Tucker’s address, the audience joined the inductees in reciting the NCO Creed. Then, three NCOs representing the NCOs of the past, present and future lit three candles displayed behind wooden “N,” “C” and “O” letters. A red candle represented valor, a white candle honor and integrity, and a blue candle vigilance.

As their names were called, the young men and women each walked under a wooden archway signifying their transition from junior enlisted to NCO and then signed their name alongside their command sergeant major’s on their certificate – the “Charge to the Newly Promoted Noncommissioned Officer.” To end the ceremony, the group proudly sang the Army song.

Sgt. Luis Peluyera Rivera, one of the nine inducted during the ceremony, said he is proud of his and his comrades’ accomplishments.

“I feel like I’ve made it. We are the backbone of the Army, and it is great to finally be a part of it,” he said.

The charge to the newly promoted noncommissioned officer, signed by both the NCO and the command sergeant major, states, “I will discharge carefully and diligently the duties of the grade to which I have been promoted and uphold the traditions and standards of the Army. I understand that Soldiers of lesser rank are required to obey my lawful orders. Accordingly, I accept responsibility for their actions. As a noncommissioned officer, I accept the charge to observe and follow the orders and directions given by supervisors acting according to the laws, articles and rules governing the discipline of the Army, I will correct conditions detrimental to the readiness thereof. In so doing, I will fulfill my greatest obligation as a leader and thereby confirm my status as a noncommissioned officer.” (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
The charge to the newly promoted noncommissioned officer, signed by both the NCO and the command sergeant major, states, “I will discharge carefully and diligently the duties of the grade to which I have been promoted and uphold the traditions and standards of the Army. I understand that Soldiers of lesser rank are required to obey my lawful orders. Accordingly, I accept responsibility for their actions. As a noncommissioned officer, I accept the charge to observe and follow the orders and directions given by supervisors acting according to the laws, articles and rules governing the discipline of the Army, I will correct conditions detrimental to the readiness thereof. In so doing, I will fulfill my greatest obligation as a leader and thereby confirm my status as a noncommissioned officer.” (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Three NCOs acting on behalf of NCOs of the past, present and future light three candles. The red candle represents valor, the white honor and integrity, and the blue vigilance. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)
Three NCOs acting on behalf of NCOs of the past, present and future light three candles. The red candle represents valor, the white honor and integrity, and the blue vigilance. (Photo by Meghan Portillo / NCO Journal)

Senior NCOs, international counterparts begin first-ever leadership symposium

By PABLO VILLA
NCO Journal

The value of good leadership wasn’t the only thing stressed during the opening day of the first-ever International Training and Leader Development Symposium.

The event, which began Tuesday at Fort Bliss, Texas, with opening remarks from Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel A. Dailey and Gen. Daniel B. Allyn, Army vice chief of staff. In attendance are a slew of U.S. Army senior enlisted Soldiers along with their international counterparts representing about 55 countries.

The objective of the conference, which ends Thursday, is not only to reinforce the importance of a quality noncommissioned officer corps to a country’s respective army, but also to foster international partnerships and gird U.S. senior enlisted leaders for the task they face as part of a fluctuating Army in a world rife with tumult. Dailey said the impetus for the conference came about nine months ago while he was in Indonesia meeting with New Zealand, Australian and Canadian counterparts.

“The Australian sergeant major said, ‘Hey, mates, let’s go get a pint and talk about something,’” Dailey said. “I said, ‘Hey, 2 o’clock in the afternoon, that’s not an American tradition, but I’m willing to learn international ways.’ So we did just that. We came up with this idea of bringing an international coalition of senior enlisted partners together on an annual basis to be able to build the coalition partnership. The officers already have it, and we thought it was important that our Soldiers see that.”

To help underline that message, Dailey invited Allyn to speak at the conference.

“The vice chief of staff of the Army is the person who helps you get the things you need done on an everyday basis for Soldiers,” Dailey said. “The chief and the secretary, unfortunately, could not come, so I walked into the vice’s office about a week ago, and in Pentagon time that is way late. I said, ‘Sir, I need your help. I have a group of noncommissioned officers, both American and international, that need to hear the voice of senior leadership in the Army.’”

Allyn jumped at the chance. The 35th vice chief of staff of the Army — a role he assumed in August 2014 — said he holds the NCO Corps in high regard, and not merely because his father-in-law was a command sergeant major.

Gen. Daniel B. Allyn, Army vice chief of staff, speaks Tuesday during the opening remarks of the International Training and Leader Development Symposium at Fort Bliss, Texas. The event has drawn dozens of senior enlisted leaders and their international counterparts to discuss the challenges they face in the future. (Photo by Spc. James Seals)
Gen. Daniel B. Allyn, Army vice chief of staff, speaks Tuesday during the opening remarks of the International Training and Leader Development Symposium at Fort Bliss, Texas. The event has drawn dozens of senior enlisted leaders and their international counterparts to discuss the challenges they face in the future. (Photo by Spc. James Seals)

“I had no intention of making a career of service,” Allyn told those in attendance. “I was smart enough to marry a command sergeant’s major daughter. So I was getting noncommissioned officer counseling every single time I went back home. Just think about having a command sergeant major in your hip pocket for life. Is that awesome or what?

“I actually had a motto when I first joined the Army that I’m not in the Army for a long time, I’m in the Army for a good time. But what’s happened along the way is I’ve been having a good time for a long time. The reason is because of how I’ve been inspired by our Noncommissioned Officers Corps. I tell people the reason I’m still in the Army today is I’m trying to pay back the noncommissioned officers who taught me what right looked like as a young company commander in 1st Ranger Battalion. I’ve been paying back for 28 years and I can’t get the debt down.”

Allyn said one of the main challenges facing today’s senior enlisted leaders is maintaining professionalism and competency in an age in which the Army’s resources are stretched considerably. He pointed to the commitment of all three of the Army’s corps headquarters and eight of its 18 division headquarters to missions throughout the globe under the cloud of a drawdown as evidence of how engaged the Force is. Doing more with less is a notion the Army will face as it moves into the future. It’s something even Allyn’s office knows too well.

“Believe me, Gen. (Mark A.) Milley would much prefer to be here,” Allyn said of the Army chief of staff’s absence from the conference. “But he suffers from the same problem that we all do as senior leaders in the Army — that is an inability to clone yourself and be two places at one time. So what do we do? We empower our team to help represent and expand influence and be the chief of staff of the Army’s representative everywhere we go. Certainly all of you as command sergeants major understand what that’s all about. You are the Army’s support chain that represents all our commanders in the field. You do it ably, you do it professionally and you do it each and every day. That’s what makes our Army such an amazing place to come to work and, really, the most trusted profession in the world.”

Working through a drawdown in the Army is not a new concept. It’s something that retired Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan, former Army chief of staff, dealt with during his tenure from 1991 to 1995. Sullivan was present at the conference where he was honored by Dailey and five former sergeants major of the army. Dailey awarded Sullivan with the first-ever honorary sergeant major of the army award during a ceremony. Afterward, he addressed those in attendance.

“I had the unenviable task of making the Army smaller after the first Gulf War,” Sullivan said. “In four years, we lost 400,000, we brought the Army down to about 500,000 active. The glue that held it all together was the noncommissioned officer corps — people out on the front lines, people like you. You are the ones who shoulder the heavy burden.”

To help fulfill that duty going forward, Allyn said leaders have to commit to living and exuding the five essential characteristics of the Army profession — military expertise, honorable service, trust, esprit de corps and stewardship of the profession. These characteristics are based on the Army Values and help foster trust between Soldiers, leaders, families, the Army and the American people.

“This profession of ours has been built on the backs of extraordinary leaders over the past three or four decades,” Allyn said. “When we talk about, ‘How do we keep this going? How do we ensure that this great profession that we’ve built endures.’ It’s all about (these characteristics). It’s about living and exemplifying leaders of character who make values-based decisions each and every day. It’s living up to the SMA’s initiative with, ‘Not In My Squad.’ … It is all about inspiring our Noncommissioned Officer Corps to exemplify the first stanza of the NCO Creed each and every moment of each and every day — ‘No one is more professional than I.’”

That professionalism is something that has long been admired by armies of partner nations. Allyn said one of the recurring questions he is asked when overseas is how to grow a noncommissioned officer corps such as the one in the U.S. Army. Allyn said it is a longstanding and arduous commitment that has yielded such an accomplished group of American NCOs. The challenge that the Army has faced in imbuing partner nations with its concept has been immense.

“We’re finding out that this is a lot harder than just putting stripes on a soldier’s uniform and saying, ‘Hey, go do good things,’” Allyn said.

That is part of the reason USASMA has brought together so many international leaders — to learn from each other’s tribulations and to establish a lasting network of international partnership that can prove mutually beneficial during future conflicts and challenges.

“It’s great to be surrounded by so many professionals,” Allyn said. “It’s an incredible honor to have 55 countries joining us here today. As I have served around the globe and particularly in combat environments over this last 20 years, it has been our teammates, our partners and our allies that have stuck with us through some pretty tough times. Their nations have signed on and committed with us.

“(U.S. NCOs should know) just how important you remain to our Army, how important your leadership, your professionalism, your commitment to standards of discipline will be as we try to stabilize a world that is rapidly trying to spin out of control. It’s going to be the actions of empowered and accountable leaders at the noncommissioned officer level who will ensure that we continue to deliver what our nation needs to do.”

Father, son exemplify Army Values as NCOs, and in the boxing ring

Referee famed for tagline ‘No one is more professional than I’ a driving force for enlisted son

By PABLO VILLA
NCO Journal

Father-son pairings in the Army aren’t uncommon.

But not many share the unique success of Staff Sgt. Alexis Ramos and his father, retired 1st Sgt. Rafael Ramos. Both are accomplished noncommissioned officers. And both are polished in the world of pugilism.

As an assistant boxing coach for the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program headquartered in Fort Carson, Colo., Alexis Ramos has a hand in the preparation of the Army’s elite boxers as they vie for a spot on the U.S. Olympic team. For those qualifiers from WCAP’s winter sports teams, that preparation reached fruition in February during the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

Meanwhile, WCAP’s summer teams are building up for their own runs to the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The younger Ramos — along with head coach Staff Sgt. Charles Leverette and assistant coach Staff Sgt. Joe Guzman — is part of WCAP’s NCO staff  that is laying the groundwork for the Army’s boxers.

Alexis Ramos is also an accomplished boxer in his own right. He’s a three-time champion of the All-Army and Armed Forces tournaments, the military’s U.S. Nationals qualifiers, feats that culminated with a berth in the U.S. trials for the 2008 Olympics.

He says his success in the sport and throughout his Army career can be attributed to determination and perseverance, traits that he has learned and honed as an NCO.

“I’ve been through a lot in my short career,” Alexis Ramos said. “I’ve had to fight through that. So I think ‘resilience’ is the biggest word that I try to teach everyone. You can overcome anything if you put your mind to it.”

He also has benefited from the knowledge and life experience gleaned from his father, he said.

“I can relate back to when I was a kid and used to see everyone talking to my dad,” Alexis Ramos said. “I can relate to the way he used to deal with all those situations when he was progressing throughout his career. And I’m very glad that I had that experience.”

From humble beginnings to the Hall of Fame

That experience lifted Rafael Ramos to a first sergeant position and a command sergeant major nomination in 1997. But he gave up the chance to become a sergeant major and retired after a 21-year Army career as a communications specialist and as a medic to allow his son, Alexis, and daughter, Marelyn, to graduate from the San Antonio high school they enrolled in during the mid-1990s.  The elder Ramos, a native of Puerto Rico, has remained in San Antonio since leaving active duty and has worked as a clinical research associate in addition to his other, more high-profile job in the ring.

During the past 20 years, Rafael Ramos has developed into a top-flight professional boxing referee, evidenced by his mention in the 2013 book Third Man in the Ring, by Mike Fitzgerald and Patrick Morley, which takes a closer look at the world’s best boxing officials. He began officiating fights in 1987 at the request of then-Olympic boxing head coach Hank Johnson, who also coached the installation’s boxing team at Fort Bragg, N.C., where Ramos was stationed. This came after a stellar amateur career in three weight classes while in the Army. Ramos was also a taekwando natural, taking up the sport while at Fort Bragg and winning a silver medal at the North Carolina state tournament in 1986.

His success inside the ring as a fighter and official culminated in 2012 when he was inducted into the Puerto Rican Boxing Hall of Fame, a remarkable accomplishment considering his humble beginnings and struggles to learn the English language before joining the Army. Not a year later, Ramos is one of three who will be formally inducted into the San Antonio Boxing Hall of Fame on March 1 during a ceremony at the Alamodome. After the ceremony, Ramos will perform his officiating duties as part of the fight card featuring a rematch between super middleweights Julio César Chávez Jr. and Bryan Vera.

“I was fortunate that they inducted me,” Rafael Ramos said. “But for me, the emotions were so great. My family was there. My friends were there. Peers came out from everywhere.

“As an NCO, I tell the people that you always can look forward and you always can be great if you dedicate yourself to do it. Dedication is everything. If you’re going to be a Soldier, you’ve got to become a good Soldier and be dedicated to become the best of who you are. And that’s what I did.”

NCO values a boon for boxing

While both Ramos men have been indefatigable when the gloves are on, they both credit their time as NCOs as the catalyst for their success inside the ring.

For Alexis, the opportunity to work closely with Soldiers came after his father’s initial hesitance.

Staff Sgt. Alexis Ramos, left, assistant boxing coach for the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, trains with Staff Sgt. Reyes Manuel Marquez at the WCAP boxing gym at Fort Carson, Colo. Ramos has experienced success in both the Army and in the sport of boxing, a familiar feat in his family. His father, Rafael Ramos, retired as a first sergeant in 1997 and was inducted into the Puerto Rican Boxing Hall of Fame in 2012. The elder Ramos works as a professional boxing referee. (Photo by Pablo Villa)
Staff Sgt. Alexis Ramos, left, assistant boxing coach for the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program, trains with Staff Sgt. Reyes Manuel Marquez at the WCAP boxing gym at Fort Carson, Colo. Ramos has experienced success in both the Army and in the sport of boxing, a familiar feat in his family. His father, Rafael Ramos, retired as a first sergeant in 1997 and was inducted into the Puerto Rican Boxing Hall of Fame in 2012. The elder Ramos works as a professional boxing referee. (Photo by Pablo Villa)

“He didn’t want me to join the Army,” Alexis Ramos said of his father. “He wanted me to go to college. He said if I wanted to join the Army, he wanted me to do it as an Army officer. I was initially going to live up to his wishes. That’s why I joined as a reservist. But as I continued in my Army career, I saw that relationship of the enlisted Soldier and the NCO. There’s a reason why they call us the ‘backbone of the Army’. We deal with Soldiers every day, and I like that. I like dealing with Soldiers. I like that one-on-one. I like being able to be that mentor, that counselor for Soldiers and helping them through problems.”

That desire to mentor and train makes the role of coach a natural fit for the younger Ramos, who took an interest in boxing in high school, despite his father’s wishes against it. Rafael Ramos didn’t offer his son a blessing to take part in the same brutal sport he participated in for so many years until he found his son in the backyard of their San Antonio home engaged in a boxing match with several friends in attendance.

“We called them ‘backyard championship fights,’” Alexis Ramos said of the makeshift bouts. “We’d invite football players, and we’d just go at it. We even created a belt. For a while I had it, which was cool for a 119-pounder fighting all these guys. But one day, my dad walked into the backyard, and that’s where he brought me into boxing. He said, ‘Oh, you want to fight? OK, let’s do it.’”

Alexis trained under Wilfredo Esperon, a friend of his father’s who was an Air Force veteran and was nationally ranked as an amateur boxer.

After enlisting in the Army in 2005, Alexis continued his training. He credits his first NCO, Staff Sgt. Shawn Sullivan, with encouraging him to continue chasing his boxing goals while also instilling in him what it meant to be a Soldier. Ramos’ time under Sullivan further engrained the impact that a positive, professional NCO can have on his Soldiers. The elder Ramos says he has seen his son evolve into that figure.

“As an NCO, he’s moving really fast,” Rafael Ramos said. “He’s dedicated himself. He’s very professional. That’s what I like to see from my son, because he puts his mind to a goal and he’s going to accomplish it.”

For now, that goal is helping his fellow coaches and fighters prepare for a potential position on the U.S. Olympic team. He’d like to dispel notions that being a part of WCAP, the  program that trains and promotes nationally and internationally ranked athletes, is an easy assignment.

“A lot of people kind of get this negative image of WCAP, like, ‘That’s all they do? That’s a cake walk,’” Ramos said. “But when they come over here, they realize that we are Soldiers first. We still get tasked out. If our command needs us, we return to units and deploy as needed. And you’ve got to realize that, at the same time, WCAP is a selection of the very elite. At any one time there’s only between 70 and 100 Soldiers. It’s not a lot of people, a very small percentage. We continue our athletic training, our academic training and Soldier careers in addition to competing for our respective sports.”

As such, Ramos strives to be the best Soldier he can be and continues to forge his own path, even if it appears to be one that’s been traveled before.

“My dad, he’s left a hard road. But I would say you can’t always try to achieve what they’ve achieved,” Alexis Ramos said. “It seems like I’m following in his footsteps, which I am. But I wasn’t trying to measure up to him. I was trying to go on my own path. It just happens to be that both of us love boxing and so it ended up this way. But I would say just do your best, follow your own footsteps and aim above the mark so you can always reach the standard.”

‘No one is more professional than I’

Standards are something Rafael Ramos maintains steadfastly when he steps inside the ring.

Ramos has officiated a multitude of fights on five continents and has built a reputation as one of the best referees in the sport because of his control, knowledge of the rules and fairness. He was the third man in the ring for the March 2010 superfight between welterweights Manny Pacquiao and Joshua Clottey at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Ramos also officiated the 2009 Ring magazine and ESPN fight of the year between lightweights Juan Manuel Marquez and Juan Diaz in Houston. His most recent big-name main event came in June 2013 when Mikey Garcia defeated Juan Manuel Lopez to defend his featherweight title.

But no matter who is in the ring when he’s refereeing, Ramos always has one final message for the combatants before they touch gloves.

“When I give my instructions to the fighters, you’re gonna hear me say: ‘No one is more professional than I,’” Ramos said. “That comes from the NCO Creed. That’s how I honor the Soldiers — the active-duty, retirees and the fallen Soldiers. That’s why I do that.”

It also came as a request from Alexis, who wanted his dad to present an homage to NCOs and Soldiers in front of the hordes of boxing fans who might be taking in one of his fights.

“I asked him as, one, an NCO myself and, two, as him being a retired NCO, and for Soldiers in general, if he would be able to say that before the fights,” Alexis Ramos said. “All the great referees have their own tagline. But I think representing the Army and representing the NCO Creed every time he steps out was something that a lot of people would recognize and a lot of Soldiers would appreciate it.”

And how does Rafael Ramos handle the pressure created by the angry glaze of lights, high-profile fighters and an audience of millions? His answer is one that applies to his son’s NCO career and all Soldiers looking for success.

“Because I was an NCO, I know we put the mission first,” Ramos said. “We forget everything around us, and we dedicate ourselves just to that mission or to that fight. Just like all NCOs, we have to do whatever it takes to accomplish the mission. So I focus, and that’s what I do. That’s how I do it. That’s how all Soldiers do it.”

Retired 1st Sgt. Rafael Ramos, left, poses with his son, Staff Sgt. Alexis Ramos, at the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program boxing gym in Fort Carson, Colo.
Retired 1st Sgt. Rafael Ramos, left, poses with his son, Staff Sgt. Alexis Ramos, at the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program boxing gym in Fort Carson, Colo.