Tag Archives: Army Medical Command

Best medic winners named after grueling competition

NCO Journal report

Two medics representing the U.S. Army Special Operations Command were named the Army’s best medics after a grueling 72-hour competition at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and Camp Bullis, Texas.

Staff Sgt. Noah Mitchell and Sgt. Derick Bosley from the 75th Ranger Regiment, representing the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, were named the winners of the Command Sgt. Maj. Jack L. Clark Jr. Best Medic Competition during a ceremony Friday at the Army Medical Department Center and School at Fort Sam Houston. Both Mitchell and Bosley are stationed at Fort Benning, Georgia.

Staff Sgt. Noah Mitchell and Sgt. Derick Bosley of the 75th Ranger Regiment, representing the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, are the 2016 winners of the Command Sgt. Maj. Jack L. Clark Jr. Best Medic Competition. Pictured from left are Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general for the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Mitchell, Bosley and Command Sgt. Maj. Gerald C. Ecker, command sergeant major for the U.S. Army Medical Command. (Photo courtesy of AMEDDC&S)
Staff Sgt. Noah Mitchell and Sgt. Derick Bosley of the 75th Ranger Regiment, representing the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, are the 2016 winners of the Command Sgt. Maj. Jack L. Clark Jr. Best Medic Competition. Pictured from left are Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general for the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Mitchell, Bosley and Command Sgt. Maj. Gerald C. Ecker, command sergeant major for the U.S. Army Medical Command. (Photo courtesy of AMEDDC&S)

Second place went to Sgt. Matthew Evans and Sgt. Jarrod Sheets from the 10th Mountain Division, and third place went to Cpt. Jeremiah Beck and Sgt. Seyoung Lee from the 2nd Infantry Division. Awards were also presented for the top performing teams in different categories, including the best overall physical fitness score, medical skills score and marksmanship score.

The competition, hosted by Army Medical Command and conducted by AMEDDC&S, is designed to test Soldiers’ tactical medical proficiency, teamwork and leadership skills. The competing teams were graded in the areas of physical fitness – in addition to PT and combat water survival tests, they were required to walk up to 30 miles throughout the competition – tactical pistol and rifle marksmanship, land navigation and overall knowledge of medical, technical and tactical proficiencies.

Wesley P. Elliot of Army Medicine contributed to this report.
Header image courtesy of AMEDDC&S.

Phase 2 of ‘Performance Triad’ focuses on eating for health, performance

By DAVID VERGUN
Army News Service

Soldiers who switch to a healthier diet will notice an immediate change in how they feel and perform, said a registered dietitian.

It’s important to eat a variety of foods to get the optimal amounts of the nutrients that promote health, said Col. Laurie Sweet. Just adding eight servings of fruits and vegetables a day to a balanced diet that also includes whole grains, lean proteins, low-fat dairy and healthy fats can make all the difference. Fish, nuts and beans are also excellent choices, she added.

In contrast, Sweet said Soldiers should eat fewer processed foods, foods that have added sugars and fats, refined grains and foods that have low nutrient density or empty calories. These foods are associated with weight gain and increased risk of chronic diseases.

Unfortunately, fewer than 15 percent of service members reported consuming three or more servings of fruits, vegetables, or whole grains a day, she added. An excellent basic tool that anyone can use to encourage better food choices is the “My Plate” concept. My Plate suggests having half a plate of fruits and vegetables at each meal along with small portions of protein, whole grains and dairy.

Sweet spoke Aug. 8, at the Army Medical Department in Falls Church, Va., during Army Medical Command’s first “Stand Up for Health Training Day,” which focused on the Army’s Ready and Resilient program’s “Performance Triad.”

Besides being a dietitian, Sweet is also a nutrition consultant to the Army surgeon general and the nutrition lead for the Performance Triad program.

The Performance Triad consists of three components, including activity, nutrition and sleep. All three are essential to a Soldier’s good health and emotional well-being, as well as cognitive and physical performance, Sweet said.

Healthy nutrition, Sweet said, has a positive interactive effect with the other two legs of the Performance Triad, activity and sleep. Eating healthy foods contributes to rapid muscle rebuilding when consumed 30-60 minutes following workouts as well as improved sleep quality.

Combat readiness

Poor nutrition habits can have negative consequences not just for health and performance but also for retention in the Army.

“Unfortunately, some 15 percent of active-duty Soldiers are enrolled in the Army Body Composition Program,” she said.

In 2012, about 1,815 Soldiers were separated due to being overweight and having a high body mass index. Being overweight doesn’t just affect a Soldier’s appearance, she said. It also affects combat readiness.

Another troubling statistic, she said, is that once Soldiers retire, they often gain weight.

“Veterans fare worse than their civilian counterparts,” she said. “Some 70 percent of veterans receiving outpatient care at the Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities are overweight or obese. That compares with 63 percent for the entire U.S. population.”

Other things to do

Sweet offered other tips besides which foods to eat and which to avoid.

Be cautious when considering dietary supplements, she advised, “since, unlike medications, most are not rigorously tested. You can’t go wrong with whole foods.”

The side effects of some supplements are unknown and some may be harmful, especially when they interact with certain medications, she said. Soldiers should inform their health care provider when taking supplements.

She also said health care providers should be asking Soldiers questions about their eating habits as well as about any dietary supplements they may be taking. She recommended visiting “Operation Supplement Safety” at: http://hprc-online.org/dietary-supplements/opss for more information.

Another tip is to refuel regularly, eat a meal or healthy snack at least every four to five waking hours. Breakfast should definitely be one of those meals, she said. A healthy snack might contain a mixture of protein and carbohydrates, she said. Nuts and fruit or low-fat chocolate milk, for instance.

Along with food, it’s important to drink at least eight glasses of water a day, more for strenuous physical work, she said. Energy drinks should never be used for rehydration.

Reducing visits to restaurants will not only save money, Soldiers will have more control over the food they eat, she said.

Lastly, she said, Soldiers should seek advice. The Army has registered dietitians who can customize a nutrition plan for peak performance and to manage health conditions. Also, there are various websites and smartphone apps that can help Soldiers select the right foods and quantities, such as Fooducate or myfitnesspal. Keeping a food diary and using social media to share tips and challenges of eating right and shedding pounds can help as well.

“Soldiers will definitely experience positive lifestyle changes if they eat for good health and performance,” Sweet said.

Also this week:

 

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Col. Laurie Sweet, a registered dietician and Performance Triad subject matter expert on nutrition, speaks at a “Stand Up for Health Training Day” seminar, Aug. 8, 2013, at the Army Medical Department in Falls Church, Va. (Photo by David Vergun)

 

Army initiates collaborative effort to address PTSD, TBI

From the Army News Service:

Over the last 12 years, many Soldiers have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan with wounds, some visible and some not, said a leader in Army Medicine.

“The invisible wounds — post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury — are just as damaging as the visible ones. They impact the families as well as the Soldiers,” said Brig. Gen. John M. Cho, a doctor, and deputy chief of staff for operations with Army Medical Command.

An Iraq war veteran himself, Cho spoke Saturday outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C., as part of National Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Day.

Post-traumatic stress disorder, known as PTSD, and traumatic brain injury, or TBI, are not just military-specific issues, Cho said. “They deserve a national discussion.”

A big part of that discussion, he said, needs to focus on reducing the stigma associated with mental health issues.

Besides a national discussion, Cho said agencies need to come together, both inside and outside the military, to learn more about identifying and treating PTSD and TBI, as well as preventing it in the first place.

As part of its collaborative effort, the Army is participating in a $60 million research study for TBI, sponsored by the National Football League, General Electric and Under Armour, he said.

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