Tag Archives: Aberdeen Proving Ground

NCOs discuss Army warfighting challenges at professional development session

By MARY B. GRIMES
CECOM Public Affairs

With an eye on 2017 and beyond, Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew D. McCoy, U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, wrapped up 2016 by hosting a professional development presentation for the Command, Control, Communications, Computer, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, or C4ISR, community.

Open to military and civilian members of the DOD workforce, the professional development session titled, “The Future of Combat; the Army Operating Concept and the Army War Fighting Challenges,” was held at the Mallette Training Facility and addressed a myriad of issues significant to the Army’s number one priority: readiness.

“While this session is designed to be CECOM specific, we wanted to open it up to the greater APG and C4ISR community,” McCoy said. “The purpose of this session was to inform our own workforce on the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command’s process of developing future Army capabilities. What this is not, is a discussion about the acquisition process and reform. It is not a deep discussion about multi-domain battle, and it’s not a discussion about the transition. It’s an introductory opening to the Army Operating Concept, the Army Warfighting challenges and the future design of combat.”

Those challenges, from Southwest Asia to Europe, make clear the need for a strong and effective force that is capable of employing the complete range of potential operations. Toward that end, Army officials say TRADOC Pam 525-31-1, “U.S. Army Operating Concept: Win in a Complex World,” is a key document in the Army concept framework, and outlines how the Army will employ forces and capabilities in complex environments against increasingly capable opponents. The Army operating concept also describes the Army’s contribution to globally integrated operations, and speaks to the need for Army forces to provide foundational capabilities for the joint force and to project power across land and from land into the air, maritime, space and cyberspace domains.

Joining in the discussion via video teleconference, keynote speaker Army Capabilities Integration Center Command Sgt. Maj. Stephen J. Travers, thanked the CECOM command sergeant major for organizing the session, and went on to provide a brief overview of the TRADOC mission.

“TRADOC is a design-build form, and we’re the design portion of that, Travers said. “It starts with a concept. Every single Army command has its purpose, and we interact as TRADOC’s future force, but we’re also an extension of the Army’s staff. TRADOC is a team of professionals from all different walks of life, all different backgrounds, to help design our future force.”

Also chiming in on the exchange, Soldiers from across C4ISR, Integrated Logistics Support Center, and the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, generated conversations that touched on such topics as gaps between new equipment and training, achieving physical and mental capabilities over adversaries, one-Army integration (multi-component fight), collaboration between centers of excellence; future force development, what winning really means, and the ability to define the winning conditions more clearly.

That future force, as Army leaders continue to point out, will have to confront a number of new strategic realities. Laying the groundwork for further discussion, McCoy said, “The Army operating concept has changed in how it defines our future challenges. What it says is that the future is unknown and even more so, it is unknowable. The Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. Mark A. Milley, has made it clear that the number one priority of the total Army is readiness, and there are no other number ones. That readiness is individual. It’s collective. It’s at the unit level that feeds our nation’s strategic readiness. Readiness is all linked to our daily operations and that helps us prepare for the future of combat in our complex world.”

The professional development session drawing to an end, McCoy said, “As we leave here today, let’s keep in mind these things: the Army is fundamentally designed for a specific purpose — to deter aggression and to fight and win when called upon. Our Army warfighting challenges are operational-needs based. They are concepts that have to be addressed to win. If they were all easy, they wouldn’t be challenges. Readiness is our number one priority. That’s how we accomplish the mission that our nation has given us … and that mission is to win. We have to win in a complex world.”

NCOs lend expertise to Army Research Laboratory

By MARTHA C. KOESTER
NCO Journal

Working among the scientists and engineers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has given Sgt. Maj. Kevin M. Connor a new appreciation for how much work goes into the equipment he and his Soldiers have used on the battlefield. Before he came to Maryland, and an issue with military equipment arose, Connor didn’t know there was an organization in the Army he could turn to, one which links the military and science communities.

As sergeant major for ARL in Adelphi, Md., Connor now has the opportunity to fix those things before they get to the Soldier.

“[As a noncommissioned officer,] I came up through the ranks, knowing certain equipment didn’t necessarily work for me,” Connor said. “Hopefully, we [NCOs assigned to ARL] can give Soldiers a better experience with the equipment versus some of the challenges we have faced in our previous assignments and duty stations.”

As the premier laboratory for the United States’ land forces, ARL

Sgt. 1st Class John C. Hardwick sees how testing of advanced combat helmets is done at Army Research                                                                                                                                                                                                             Lab’s Environment for Auditory Research. EAR is a part of the Human Research and Engineering Directorate. (Photo by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)
Sgt. 1st Class John C. Hardwick sees how testing of advanced combat helmets is done at Army Research Lab’s Environment for Auditory Research. EAR is a part of the Human Research and Engineering Directorate. (Photo by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)

of the U.S. Army Research Development and Engineering Command has touched all NCOs and their Soldiers by providing the enabling technologies in many of the Army’s critical weapons systems. NCOs play a direct role in the development of weapons technology, serving as advisers for ARL’s directorates and assisting in equipment testing.

“Most of the Army doesn’t even know ARL exists,” Connor said. “So, one of the things I do when I’m at other military installations is I try to meet other sergeants major and educate them about ARL and say, ‘Did you know that we can help you solve some problems or issues you have with equipment?’ Or I will talk to Soldiers if they have a better equipment design or something of that nature [so I can pass it along].”

Doing their part

At the Soldier Performance and Equipment Advanced Research facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., NCOs such as Connor assist operations by providing the Soldiers who will test equipment. SPEAR puts equipment, which is intended to augment Soldiers, through vigorous testing.

For example, Soldiers may run through an obstacle course to test whether exoskeletons offer improved agility, or Soldiers may test devices developed to assist in carrying their loads as scientists measure their activity on a treadmill, said Philip Crowell, SPEAR biomechanics team leader.

“Our research focuses on how equipment affects Soldier

Staff Sgt. David A. Hoisington works at the Communications-Electronics Command, analyzing software data. CECOM researchers say Hoisington’s experience contributes greatly to research. (Photo by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)
Staff Sgt. David A. Hoisington works at the Communications-Electronics Command, analyzing software data. CECOM researchers say Hoisington’s experience contributes greatly to research. (Photo by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)

performance,” Crowell said. “For the Soldiers who participate in our studies, it’s an opportunity for them to see a different part of the Army. They get to see the research and development side where equipment and concepts are created and refined long before they get fielded.

“Because we value their feedback regarding the studies, this is also a chance for them to have an influence on things that are being developed for use by Soldiers in the future,” Crowell said.

Soldier participation is important to the scientists who research human factors and the ways Soldiers interact with military equipment. At ARL’s Environment for Auditory Research, which is part of the Human Research and Engineering Directorate, or HRED, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, a Soldier is valued for his or her knowledge of jargon and types of cues or commands used in military communication systems during the testing of advanced combat helmets, said Dr. Angelique A. Scharine, EAR auditory research team lead.

Acting branch chief Christopher Paulillo praised Staff Sgt. David A. Hoisington, an enlisted advisor for HRED, and said Hoisington’s intelligence background is invaluable when analyzing software data for the Communications-Electronics Command, or CECOM, at Aberdeen Proving Ground. CECOM researcher Diane Quarles also said Hoisington’s experience contributes greatly to research.

“[Staff] Sergeant Hoisington was asking questions that a user would want to know and I don’t have the operational knowledge that a user has to ask those questions,” Quarles said. “He was able to ask the questions that the Soldiers would want to know, as opposed to me just saying, ‘Does your software do this and how?’ With his support during these interviews, we were able to collect more detailed information on the systems.”

A collaboration

NCOs also see their subject-matter expertise as a vital contribution to ARL’s piece in the big Army puzzle.

“We offer that ground-level, subject-matter expertise,” said Sgt. 1st

Army Research Laboratory’s Staff Sgt. David A. Hoisington (left) and Sgt. 1st Class John C. Hardwick demonstrate how testing is performed at the Soldier Performance and Equipment Advanced Research facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. At the SPEAR facility, researches examine how equipment affects Soldier performance. Hoisington is an enlisted advisor for Human Research and Engineering Directorate at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Hardwick is senior enlisted advisor for ARL’s Simulation and Training Technology Center in Orlando, Fla.  (Photo by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)
Army Research Laboratory’s Staff Sgt. David A. Hoisington (left) and Sgt. 1st Class John C. Hardwick demonstrate how testing is performed at the Soldier Performance and Equipment Advanced Research facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. At the SPEAR facility, researches examine how equipment affects Soldier performance. Hoisington is an enlisted advisor for Human Research and Engineering Directorate at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Hardwick is senior enlisted advisor for ARL’s Simulation and Training Technology Center in Orlando, Fla. (Photo by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)

Class John C. Hardwick, senior enlisted advisor for ARL’s Simulation and Training Technology Center in Orlando, Fla. “I think it’s important to have that NCO, that subject-matter expert involved in the early stages of the research and the development. They can point out some of those things at the beginning when flaws are easily fixed.”

We have the opportunity to reach out and work with a lot of people, during the opening stages of military equipment development, Hoisington said.

“We’re looking at the human factors of what can be better, how can we make it work easier and what are the basic things that you can look at to change and integrate better for the Soldier,” he said.

Soldier feedback counts greatly for teams such as HRED’s Dismounted Warrior Branch at Aberdeen Proving Ground, which focuses on shooting performance research and development.

I love this job. It’s the best job in the world,” said Frank Morelli, an experimental psychologist for the Dismounted Warrior Branch. “It’s very satisfying working with Soldiers. You can see the appreciation they have for what you do because what you do is try to make their jobs better, try to make them more capable. It makes us feel good because that’s who we work for.”

Impact on the future

For NCOs accustomed to being at larger military installations where civilians are in the minority, working for ARL may be a little disorienting. Its workforce of scientists and engineers vastly outnumbers Soldiers.

“It was culture shock because I had been in Germany, where we didn’t have many civilians and it was primarily Soldiers,” Hoisington said. “We had two or three civilians supporting us. It’s definitely been a growth opportunity because I was used to dealing with Soldiers. Dealing with civilians is completely different.”

“I know for me it was a very eye-opening experience, having been an infantry Soldier and pretty much being operational my entire career,” Hardwick said. “This was an entirely different part of the Army I never knew existed. I look at it as very rewarding because I am now on the technology end of military equipment and technology and helping out the Army of the future.”

As sergeant major for ARL in Adelphi, Connor’s working relationship with subordinate NCOs in his charge has to be long distance.

“It is a little different being in ARL versus a garrison because most of the NCOs in the unit are in another location,” Connor said. “It’s really having the faith and trust in those NCOs who are out in other locations.”

ARL’s NCOs realize their time there has afforded them many advantages and lessons they can take and use later in their Army careers.

“It has helped me develop interpersonal skills,” Hardwick said. “It’s given me that perspective on this entire other side of the Army that I was just never really aware of. Now, I know who I can reach out to and say, ‘There’s a problem with this piece of equipment.’ Or if I have a Soldier who has a good idea for a piece of equipment, I know the system and the process of how to get that to RDECOM.”

“There are a lot of people here doing a lot of things for the Army that people just don’t know about,” Connor said. “When I go back to the mainstream Army, I can say to my Soldiers, ‘You don’t realize all the work that goes into the equipment in your hands. This is years in the planning to get it to you.’”

Equipment issues?

The Army Research Laboratory’s Operations Center is ready to assist with equipment issues. Please contact the center by email at usarmy.adelphi.rdecom-arl.mbx.arleoc@mail.mil or by calling (301) 394-0988 or via DSN at 290-0988.

 

Biologist arms Soldiers with training on biochemical crises

By MARTHA C. KOESTER
NCO Journal

Surrounded by biochemical hazards on a daily basis, Carrie Poore wouldn’t want to be anywhere else than training noncommissioned officers and their Soldiers to spot chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear targets and explosives in the field.

Carrie Poore, a biologist at ECBC, leads training exercises in June at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Poore wants to help Soldiers recognize and defend against chemical and biological threats. (Photos by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)
Carrie Poore, a biologist at ECBC, leads training exercises in June at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Poore wants to help Soldiers recognize and defend against chemical and biological threats. (Photos by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)

A biologist at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center who serves as an advanced Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives, or CBRNE, training team leader, Poore aims to help Soldiers recognize and defend against chemical and biological threats using computer simulation technology and real world scenarios. Poore is part of a small mobile training team based at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

To help with the training, she also sets up clandestine laboratories in what looks like an ordinary Maryland neighborhood. The scene ends up resembling something out of the AMC network crime drama “Breaking Bad.”

Subject matter expert

“Once I started training, I found it’s the best job I could ever have,” Poore said. “[Soldiers] take everything that you say, and they just eat it up, asking question after question. You really have to know and understand this training in order to convey it to somebody else, because they ask every possible question in every configuration possible. It’s an amazing opportunity.”

Poore and her team of subject matter experts focus on training NCOs and their Soldiers on how terrorists would work covertly, what their thought processes would be when making a chemical or biological agent, how they would do it, what

Carrie Poore, a biologist at ECBC, wants Soldiers to think outside the box during training exercises to help them recognize and defend against chemical and biological threats. Poore often uses simple household items in her training to help Soldiers recognize threats.
Carrie Poore, a biologist at ECBC, wants Soldiers to think outside the box during training exercises to help them recognize and defend against chemical and biological threats. Poore often uses simple household items in her training to help Soldiers recognize threats.

kinds of materials they would use, and what the footprint would look like. The training gives NCOs life-saving skills.

“We are out in the field a lot,” Poore said of her team, whose next assignment was to train NCOs at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. “We have some amazing opportunities. I have been to Kuwait and Cambodia, and everybody is so appreciative of what we teach them.”

“When our forces go out into the field for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives missions, the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center goes with them for support,” said Joseph L. Corriveau, director of ECBC. “We bring a laboratory to give Soldiers support out in the field for various things they might come across. Carrie Poore helps to train all military services and service support teams, as well as the FBI on chem bio response.”

Poore’s style of training encourages Soldiers to think outside the box when they come across a potential target in the field because “in order for them to do their jobs really well, they almost have to think like a terrorist.” In Poore’s lab, Soldiers won’t find bacteria growing in a $4,000 fermenter. It most likely will be seen growing in a bucket because it works just as well.

“We do this on purpose, so they begin thinking of how common items can be repurposed to produce CBRNE effects,” Poore said.

Life and death

Though some of the Soldiers they train have no technical background, Poore and her team want to supply them with as much knowledge as possible so that Soldiers can be confident that they can execute their jobs in a safe manner. Training

Carrie Poore, a biologist at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center who serves as an advanced Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives training team leader, trains noncommissioned officers during a June exercise at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.
Carrie Poore, a biologist at the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center who serves as an advanced Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives training team leader, trains noncommissioned officers during a June exercise at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

could be the difference between life and death in the field.

“Our lead chemist and training curriculum developer, Mike Cain, had the chance to talk with a group that we’d trained who went overseas and came back,” Poore said. “They said the training they received from us made a significant difference in successfully completing their mission, and that it helped keep them safe. We don’t hear much feedback, but the fact that Soldiers keep coming back for training speaks volumes.”

Poore said it’s an honor being a part of the Army’s effort to counter threats of weapons of mass destruction. She acknowledged that training for NCOs to recognize potential threats as responders isn’t easy. They have to fully comprehend the threats.

““I had the luxury of taking 9½ years just to learn biology [in college], and we’re asking them to learn about all five CBRNE elements in a short amount of time,” she said. “They do have a lot to understand, a lot to learn. Then, at the same time, what you are working with can kill you. That’s a big deal.”

ECBC teams up with Soldiers to thwart WMD threats

By MARTHA C. KOESTER
NCO Journal

In the mission to protect the homeland from emerging threats, the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center stands ready to help Soldiers adapt to a changing world ─ one which includes combating weapons of mass destruction.

“In the big Army perspective, weapons of mass destruction is one of our top priorities, and it’s one of the Army’s top 20 warfighter challenges,” said Joseph L. Corriveau, director of ECBC at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. “The Army really is putting a lot of energy into making sure we protect Soldiers from the chemical biological threats. That goes beyond that, to the homeland.”

ECBC, an organization of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, has a civilian workforce of

Masks are tested by the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s Protection Factor and Toxic Chamber Group in June at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Army equipment is put through extensive testing before it gets to Soldiers in the field. (Photos by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)
Masks are tested by the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center’s Protection Factor and Toxic Chamber Group in June at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Army equipment is put through extensive testing before it gets to Soldiers in the field. (Photos by Martha C. Koester / NCO Journal)

about 1,400 and only two military personnel. ECBC’s expertise is in science and technology as well as the Department of Defense’s authority in chemical and biological defense. Sgt. Maj. Jamison L. Johnson, senior enlisted advisor to the director, is right in the middle of it, offering his military expertise in vulnerability assessment.

“Not coming from a chemical background, I had to figure out where I fit in,” Johnson said. “Coming here as a noncommissioned officer, I realized right away what the capabilities were here and how much this place has to offer. It’s quite amazing.”

Johnson quickly found himself accompanying ECBC’s divisions, such as Advanced Design and Manufacturing workers, on project test-runs. He accompanied ADM workers recently to Mississippi, where they flew unmanned aerial vehicles with chemical, biological, radiological and explosives sensors. Johnson helps evaluate projects for the divisions at ECBC, and they keep him busy.

“This is where NCOs are a huge advantage for [ECBC] because they get direct interaction from us [in the military],” he said.

 Lessons in collaboration

Developing multimedia and interactive training aids for Soldiers takes a certain level of skills, and ADM team members have backgrounds in computer science as well as art and animation.

“The engineers, the product developers, the warfighters, we are integrated so … we [can] start using this technology in a specific way to do training for a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) missions,” said Jeffrey A. Warwick, conceptual modeling and animation team leader. “It’s great to train the Soldiers on the things they need to recognize and learn. We can also get into the true operational support where if Soldiers [returning from deployment] have captured data of a [suspect] facility, we can create a model and put it in virtual reality technology. It can be used to post-train Soldiers and explain what other Soldiers saw.”

The experts at ADM use video game technology to create realistic projects to help train Soldiers on CBRNE missions. Oculus Rift, a new virtual reality headset, is one of those projects.

“When I put this headset on, it really immerses me into that environment,” said Jason Gitlin, ADM animation project manager and 3D artist. “By putting on the Oculus, you start to really understand the spatial constraints [of a building] and what it feels like to be in that environment.”

The ADM team gets its project feedback from ECBC trainers and staff members, as well as Soldiers who have taken the training. ADM team members also frequently reach out to consult with Johnson about the technology behind projects.

Other divisions at ECBC, such as the Protection Factor and Toxic Chamber Group, use Soldiers as well as civilians to test projects extensively before the equipment gets to Soldiers in the field.

“I think the most important thing [we provide] with testing is that when a Soldier gets [new] equipment, it gives them the confidence to say, ‘My equipment is working right, and I’m safe whenever I go out,’” said Steven Yurechko, Protection Factor and Toxic Chamber Group, ECBC.

On an international stage

Because of its expertise in science and technology, the Army called in ECBC to destroy a stockpile of declared chemical

Masks are put through rigorous testing by ECBC's Protection Factor and Toxic Chamber Group at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Soldiers, as well as civilians, pose as test subjects during equipment testing.
Masks are put through rigorous testing by ECBC’s Protection Factor and Toxic Chamber Group at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. Soldiers, as well as civilians, pose as test subjects during equipment testing.

weapons from Syria in 2014. A volunteer team of 50 scientists and engineers got to work and began building the field deployable hydrolysis system, which is used to neutralize bulk amounts of chemical warfare agents. Using the system, more than 600 tons of chemical weapons were destroyed by the workers who deployed to the Mediterranean Sea on the container ship MV Cape Ray. It was a huge achievement for world stability and ECBC.

“We are here to provide support to the Soldier, and to national security in general, to first responders and the homeland security, because weapons of mass destruction are a challenge not only for our Soldiers but for the whole nation,” Corriveau said. “We do a lot. [In June 2014,] we were helping not just the United States, but the whole world get rid of Syrian chemical weapons.”

For the future force

Johnson believes so strongly in the value of having an NCO at ECBC that he is helping lead an effort to get more NCOs there after he leaves.

“We’re actually working on it right now with Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.,” Johnson said. “There’s a memorandum of agreement that they are trying to process to get a seasoned NCO here for a three-year tour and then rotate them out every three years. I told them optimally to have one in each of the directorates, because they are going to need their input.”

Johnson’s 22 years of experience in the Army helps him provide a strong military perspective to the experts at ECBC, he

Sgt. Maj. Jamison L. Johnson, senior enlisted advisor to the director of the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, tries out the Oculus Rift at ECBC’s Advanced Design and Manufacturing division at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. The Oculus Rift will be used to help train Soldiers for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Command missions.
Sgt. Maj. Jamison L. Johnson, senior enlisted advisor to the director of the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, tries out the Oculus Rift at ECBC’s Advanced Design and Manufacturing division at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. The Oculus Rift will be used to help train Soldiers for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Command missions.

said. He wishes he had heard of ECBC earlier because it might have changed his plans to retire soon.

“It’s so important that Sgt. Maj. Johnson is here because we are a workforce of Army civilians, and this is like our ground troop,” Corriveau said. “This is what it’s all about. He is helping our workforce.”

Working at ECBC has not only given Johnson an appreciation for science and technology, but also will ease his eventual transition into the civilian world, he said. Before his time at ECBC, Johnson had never worked with civilians.

“I think it’s good to get in that voice of the military,” Johnson said of his role at ECBC. “I think it offers a lot, especially in this type of environment. It’s just an advantage for everybody. There is no disadvantage.”

“Everything starts with the Soldier and ends with the Soldier,” Corriveau said. “It starts with what they need. We are going to give it to them, and we are going to make sure that when they are out [in the field] they have it, and we are going to help them sustain it. It’s all about the Soldier.”

About Edgewood Chemical Biological Center

● ECBC is the primary Department of Defense technical organization for nonmedical chemical and biological defense.

● ECBC’s contributions include chemical and biological agent detectors and warning systems, decontamination technologies, protective masks, and services in support of the nation’s demilitarization and homeland defense initiatives.

● ECBC is the only “all hazard” laboratory in the nation capable of handling items potentially contaminated with chemical, biological and radiological weapons.

Source: U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center; U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command

Army Research Lab explores 3-D printing to fix deployed equipment, cut costs

From the Army News Service:

New technology being developed by research engineers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and Purdue University will soon help just about any Soldier deployed in far-off locations to immediately spot and fix damaged aircraft and ground vehicle parts.

Researchers found that combining the general purpose, finite-element analysis software ABAQUS with Python, an open-source code used to optimize logical structures such as topologically interlocked structures, improves energy absorption and dissipation, productivity and lower maintenance costs.

The combination of ABAQUS and Python provides an automated process for auto-generation of the geometries, models, materials assignments and code execution, said Ed Habtour, a research engineer with U.S. Army Research Laboratory’s, or ARL’s, Vehicle Technology Directorate at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

He said the code is developed to assist designers with tools to model the new generation of 3-D additive manufactured and TISs structures.

“The benefit for the Soldier is an after-effect,” Habtour said. “The TIS would provide an excellent energy absorption and dissipation mechanism for future vehicles using additive manufacturing. Subsequently, the Soldier can print these structures in the field using additive manufacturing by simply downloading the model generated by the designer/vendor.”

Researchers found that combining the general purpose, finite-element analysis software ABAQUS with Python, an open-source code used to optimize logical structures such as topologically interlocked structures, improves energy absorption and dissipation, productivity and lowers maintenance costs. (Photo courtesy of Army News Service)
Researchers found that combining the general purpose, finite-element analysis software ABAQUS with Python, an open-source code used to optimize logical structures such as topologically interlocked structures, improves energy absorption and dissipation, productivity and lowers maintenance costs. (Photo courtesy of Army News Service)

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