Sgt. 1st Class Josh Richmond, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, fires at one of the hundreds of clays he needed to hit to earn the final double trap seat on the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team during the 2016 Shotgun Olympic Trials Part II in Tillar, Arkansas, May 19. Richmond will join two other USAMU Soldiers at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro in August.

Third U.S. Army Marksmanship Soldier heading to 2016 Olympics


By BRENDA ROLIN
U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit

After seven months of speculation and uncertainty, Sgt. 1st Class Josh Richmond, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) double trap competitor and shooter-instructor, is now headed to the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Richmond earned the last double trap seat on the 2016 U.S. Olympic Shooting Team May 19 during the 2016 Shotgun Olympic Trials in Tillar, Arkansas.

Richmond, of Hillsgrove, Pennsylvania, won the gold medal in the 2015 Fall Selection match in Tucson, Arizona, in October. That match was one of two Olympic trials for shotgun, and he has been in a waiting game since then to finish what he started.

Richmond said it was hard to describe the level of competition he faced at Tillar.

“I just kept trying to stay in the present, stay in the moment and continue my routine and just hit more targets than the rest of them,” he said.

Sgt. 1st Class Josh Richmond, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, accepts congratulations after winning the final double trap seat on the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team during the 2016 Shotgun Olympic Trials Part II in Tillar, Arkansas, May 19, 2016. Richmond also competed in the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. (U.S. Army photos by Brenda Rolin)
Sgt. 1st Class Josh Richmond, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, accepts congratulations after winning the final double trap seat on the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team during the 2016 Shotgun Olympic Trials Part II in Tillar, Arkansas, May 19, 2016. Richmond also competed in the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. (U.S. Army photos by Brenda Rolin)

Richmond’s win in Tucson in October also put him in direct competition with two of his USAMU teammates — Sgt. Derek Haldeman of Pendleton, Oregon; and Sgt. 1st Class Jeffrey Holguin of Yorba Linda, California — who won the silver and gold, respectively.

Although each one of them planned to win the nomination to the Olympic Team, Richmond, who also participated in the 2012 Olympic Games, said the three continued to train and prepare for this day together.

“We are only as strong as the weakest member of the team,” he said. “We have a strong bond and sharing this brotherhood of the Army takes it to another level. We are all happy to see each other succeed.”

Four-time Olympian and U.S. Olympic Shotgun Team coach Todd Graves said natural talent and the opportunity for Olympians to train together often gives them an edge. For the USAMU double trap team, he said this is especially true.

“As a group, being able to train together when you’ve got two or three of the top double trap shooters in the world, it helps when you get to train with them,” he said.

As for whether Graves had a favorite, he said this was a win-win situation.

“With these guys, you could have put their pictures up on a board and thrown darts at them, and I would have been happy with any of them,” he said.

Despite high hopes for skeet shooter Spc. Hayden Stewart, who is also assigned to USAMU and who tied for the gold during the 2015 Fall Selection Match, none of the USAMU skeet team members won enough points during competition to secure the final skeet position on the 2016 U.S. Olympic Shooting Team.

Though Stewart of Columbia, Tennessee, was one of the favorites to win the remaining skeet position after tying with U.S. Team member Frank Thompson in the Fall Selection Match in Tucson, Thompson ended up winning the coveted seat on the Olympic Team. Stewart finished 3rd overall.

Three other USAMU skeet team members also competed: Spc. Mark Staffen, Spc. Dustan Taylor and Pvt. Christian Elliott.

Staffen was in top form and won the gold in the skeet competition at the Shotgun Olympic Trials in Tillar.

Sgt. 1st Class Josh Richmond, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, fires at one of the hundreds of clays he needed to hit to earn the final double trap seat on the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team during the 2016 Shotgun Olympic Trials Part II in Tillar, Arkansas, May 19. Richmond will join two other USAMU Soldiers at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro in August.
Sgt. 1st Class Josh Richmond, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, fires at one of the hundreds of clays he needed to hit to earn the final double trap seat on the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team during the 2016 Shotgun Olympic Trials Part II in Tillar, Arkansas, May 19. Richmond will join two other USAMU Soldiers at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro in August.

However, Staffen didn’t have enough points from the Fall Selection Match to earn the skeet position on the Olympic Team and ended up in 5th place overall. Taylor of Shawnee, Oklahoma, and Elliott of Bedford, Indiana, finished 11th and 12th respectively.

Staffen, from Lewis Center, Ohio, said he was very happy to win the Tillar event, and he would not be shooting in the Olympic trials without the Army behind him.

“The Army has helped me a lot with getting my skill level up and providing resources to shoot at this level,” he said.

Richmond is the third Soldier from USAMU to make the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team.

He will join teammates Sgt. 1st Class Michael McPhail and Sgt. 1st Class Glenn Eller at the Games this August. McPhail, an International rifle competitor, won an automatic berth for 50-meter prone rifle Sept 3, 2015. Eller won an automatic berth for double trap Sept. 14, 2015.

McPhail of Darlington, Wisconsin, and Eller of Katy, Texas, earned their automatic berths on the U.S. Olympic Shooting Team through high finishes in international world shooting sport events in the year prior to the Games.

Soldiers competing on the world stage in international shooting competitions and the Olympic Games are a testament to the skills and training American Soldiers receive and develop.

USAMU Soldiers translate their shooting skills and lessons learned from competitions into training for other Soldiers in preparation for missions across the globe.

Invictus Games 2016:  Swimming Finals

WCAP NCO asks Prince Harry to give her Invictus gold medal to hospital that saved her life


NCO JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

U.S. Army Sgt. Elizabeth Marks won four gold medals in the swimming competition during the third day of the 2016 Invictus Games on Wednesday.

Her final medal was presented by Prince Harry, the British royal who created the competition, an international Paralympic-style, multi-sport event, which allows wounded, injured or sick armed services personnel and veterans to compete. After he placed the medal around Marks’ neck, the 25-year-old combat medic and member of the U.S. World Class Athlete Program of Fort Carson, Colorado, did something unprecedented — she tried to give the award back.

U.S. Army Sgt. Elizabeth Marks, right, appears with Prince Harry on an ESPN broadcast discussing the 2016 Invictus Games. Marks made international headlines Wednesday after asking the British royal to give one of her gold medals to the English hospital staff that saved her life two years ago. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program)
U.S. Army Sgt. Elizabeth Marks, right, appears with Prince Harry on an ESPN broadcast discussing the 2016 Invictus Games. Marks made international headlines Wednesday after asking the British royal to give one of her gold medals to the English hospital staff that saved her life two years ago. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program)

Marks wanted Prince Harry to give the medal to Papworth Hospital in Cambridge, England, where she spent the duration of the inaugural Invictus Games in 2014. Marks traveled to London in the fall of that year to compete in the Games when she collapsed with respiratory distress syndrome. Her condition worsened and she was eventually hospitalized and placed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or ECMO, life support to help her breathe. She missed the Games, but Marks said she was fortunate to come back alive. She said donating one of her medals was the only way she could think of to repay the hospital staff.

“It’s the only thing I could give to thank them for saving my life,” Marks said before sending a message to the hospital. “I will never be able to repay you, but what you are doing is wonderful. I gave one of my medals to Prince Harry and hope it will find its way back to them.”

After her harrowing ordeal Marks immediately went back to work to reclaim her form. Two months after leaving the hospital she broke an American record in the SB9, a disability swimming classification, 200-meter breaststroke. Earlier this year she set a new world record in the 50-meter breaststroke in the SB7 division during the first day of the Jimi Flowers Classic in Colorado Springs, Colorado, serving notice to the world that she will be a force at this year’s Summer Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Marks joined the Army at age 17 in July 2008 in Prescott Valley, Arizona. Her goal was to care for injured Soldiers as a combat medic, a role she carried out until she was injured. Despite her altered path in the Army, Marks hopes her efforts continue to help and motivate Soldiers.

“I don’t step onto a block or go into a pool without thinking of all my battle buddies from all around the world who suffer every day,” she said Wednesday. “I never go into a pool to win a medal, just to do them proud.”

The Invictus Games conclude today with various events broadcast live from Orlando, Florida, on ESPN2 and online at ESPN3.com. The United States team included 26 NCOs on its roster.

IIICorpsNCOA

Success with writing software is only latest example of innovation at Fort Hood NCOA


Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph McFarlane, the III Corps NCO Academy commandant, and Sgt. 1st Class Amber DeArmond, a senior group leader at the academy. (Photo by Clifford Kyle Jones / NCO Journal)

By CLIFFORD KYLE JONES
NCO Journal

The III Corps NCO Academy at Fort Hood was selected to pilot the Criterion writing assessment program last year, but that is just one of the ways the academy has adjusted its curriculum to better serve its junior NCOs.

Fort Hood’s NCO Academy is housed in the same complex as the post’s education center, so for years the commandant and deputy commandant have used the center’s counselors and other resources to encourage Soldiers to pursue an education and even to retake the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery to boost the general technical, or GT, portion of the ASVAB.

“You have to try to bring all those resources together, to where the students have every opportunity to use it,” said Sgt. Maj. Salvador Montez Jr., the NCOA’s deputy commandant. “If you can have an NCOA close to that post’s education center, that’s money. And we’re right next door. Even those test administrators come over here and give us tests during our training. It’s not part of our curriculum, but we’re trying to raise GT scores on these Soldiers, too, because that’s what’s required for them to be drill sergeants, recruiters, etc. You need a certain GT score.”

Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph McFarlane, the NCOA’s commandant, said incorporating a GT Predictor exam into the Basic Leader Course has led to an increased ASVAB score for 7 to 10 percent of BLC graduates.

“That’s one more drill sergeant, one more Ranger instructor, one more master gunner — the higher technical positions” that require higher GT scores, McFarlane said.

And although McFarlane says 7 to 10 percent may not sound like much, the Fort Hood NCOA has 220 to 300 students in each BLC and is conducting the 22-day courses almost back to back throughout the year. That percentage translates to improved scores for hundreds of Soldiers each year.

“I think that was the first reason we got tagged with [the Criterion pilot] last year — because we already had the GT Predictor incorporated into BLC here,” Montez said.

The GT Predictor program demonstrates the NCO Academy cadre’s commitment to success.

“I’ve surrendered a lot of my commandant’s time to the other things that are beneficial, just to help the students out, as well as to try to make the curriculum better without changing the curriculum,” McFarlane said of the 15 hours of BLC instruction that falls under his discretion as commandant. “I sacrifice my commandant’s time for something else that’s within the guidelines.”

Montez says the NCOA’s success is directly attributable to McFarlane.

“The commandant has to allow the flexibility and to be open enough to say, ‘Hey, this is good for the Soldiers, this is a great program. How can we make it better? What can we do?’ ” he said. “If you don’t have that type of structure in an academy to allow the NCOES system to improve, it’s just going to stay stagnant.”

The Fort Hood academy is in regular contact with the Institute for Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development, as well as the Army’s other NCO academies. This was true before the Criterion program launched, but that communication has only increased since the writing program was rolled out across the Army.

“We try to keep all academies informed, …” Montez said. “Every time we get an update, every time we get an analysis, it gets loaded where everyone can see it up to NCOPOD. They usually provide a little error analysis, and this tells you how your academy scored and executed it.”

Other academies have struggled to set up the program and get BLC students to take the assessment. Montez points to a spreadsheet that shows the number of students who took the assessment at each academy.

“There are a lot of zeroes there, because there were only 14 [NCO academies] that were able to successfully get in there,” he said.

McFarlane said, “There’s a lot of communication on Blackboard between the academies that are brand new [to Criterion] … to my cadre and myself. They haven’t seen it before. We’ve been lucky because we piloted it first, and we had the opportunity to train a bunch of cadre before it was even sent to be piloted.”

The Fort Hood NCOA cadre had challenges at the inception of the program, as well, but they have worked diligently to implement the program effectively.

“We’re always trying to improve stuff,” Montez said. “We’re always looking at making it better, and what can we do. Even the automation systems we use are the latest, and we’re eventually going to go to tablets. That’s where we want to be. We’re not there yet, but we’re pretty close.

“And I’m hoping everyone else will ask, ‘Hey, what’s Fort Hood doing?’ ” he said. “We have some good instructors who know how to articulate all that stuff to the Soldiers. And when they come here for 22 days, I want them to know that it’s all about them. It’s all about you and improving you, making you a better noncommissioned officer. Don’t be afraid to take on any task.”

Best Warrior Competition 2014

Fort Hood sets example for use of writing software during Basic Leader Course


File photo by Staff Sgt. Patricia Ramirez of 2014 Best Warrior competitors typing during the essay competition.

By CLIFFORD KYLE JONES
NCO Journal

A year-old pilot program to help new NCOs improve their writing was first rolled out at the III Corps NCO Academy at Fort Hood, Texas, and it has rapidly become just another way the cadre works to boost Soldiers’ performance and help their careers.

The program, called Criterion, is a web-based service that scores writing samples almost instantaneously and provides students with an overall score, as well as annotated diagnostic feedback on elements of grammar, usage, mechanics, style, organization and development.

“Fort Hood is one of the largest forces command posts, and we train approximately 250-300 students at the academy every 22 days, so it was an ideal place as far as location to conduct these tests here,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Joseph McFarlane, commandant of Fort Hood’s NCOA.

The academy was given wide berth in the implementation of the program, which Training and Doctrine Command rolled out last summer as part of the 22-day Warrior Leader Course — now the Basic Leader Course — at four sites, including Fort Hood.

Now Criterion is in use at all the Army’s NCO Academies, although many have struggled to launch and use the program effectively.

“Across the Army, we are looking for ways to improve NCO education in general,” Liston Bailey, Learning Innovations and Initiatives Division Institute for Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development chief at TRADOC headquarters, said when the program first launched at Fort Hood. “What we are actually attempting to do is transform the NCO education system into an NCO professional development system that will take into account training that sergeants do in every single domain; that includes the unit, self-development and in the institution.”

Through trial and error, the cadre at the III Corps NCOA have determined some best practices.

“We’re figuring out little ways to make it better,” said Sgt. Maj. Salvador Montez Jr., the NCOA’s deputy commandant. “Like this last class, we figured out little flaws we have to accommodate into our training calendar, as part of our training. The first time we just threw it out there.”

At Fort Hood, the assessment is administered on Day 1 of BLC, immediately after students check in on Day Zero. Taking the test early ensures that instructors have enough time to work with students who need help developing their writing skills and that students who miss the initial assessment have time to make it up.

“We’ve kind of organized the way we implemented for our cadre so they can go step by step, as well,” said Sgt. 1st Class Amber DeArmond, a senior group leader at the Fort Hood NCO Academy who led the implementation of the Criterion program.

For the students, she said, “We do a registration process.”

“So in Criterion, we can see how many individuals successfully enrolled in the program for our student activity. Then once we determine how many successfully enrolled, we only do the writing attempt for those students on Day 1,” she said. “After Day 1, when we do our first attempt, then we try to rectify the problem within 24 hours with the other students who weren’t successfully able to log on to the domain or (participate) for whatever reason. Then we do attempt No. 2 on Day 6.”

DeArmond said the academy has also changed the registration process since its inception to avoid using students’ names, so their personally identifiable information is protected.

The Criterion program gives students 45 minutes to write an essay on one of 400 possible topics. When they’re done, their essays are uploaded and the Criterion software gives each student’s essay a holistic score of up to six points. When students score ones or are given ranks of “advisory” because the software couldn’t score the essays, Fort Hood cadre know they need to spend extra time with those Soldiers. Usually, fewer than 5 percent of the students score one or below.

“It gauges how to employ the cadre, especially when we go through our communicative writing lesson plan,” DeArmond said. “We can tell who needs additional assistance and how we can be of assistance by looking into how they scored and where their errors occurred.”

She said BLC Soldiers’ scores have averaged about a 3.5, and she believes the target should be about a five.

There are no minimum requirements for essay scores as part of BLC; the Criterion grading is merely an assessment tool. However, BLC students receive a block of instruction on how to effectively write an NCO Evaluation Report (DA Form 2166-8), an award (DA Form 638), a sworn statement (DA Form 2823) and a memorandum for record, so the early assessment tool can be beneficial in identifying students who might benefit most from extra help during those exercises.

“These students are going to do this again a couple more times,” McFarlane said. “This is the Basic Leader Course, formerly known as WLC, and then they’re going to take it again in Advanced Leader Course, with College Level Writing 1. And then they’re going to take it again in the Senior Leader Course, with College Level Writing 2. And then the Sergeants Major Academy, which is like executive level.

“So this is the first step, the base line,” he said. “The end result is to create a senior-level NCO who can communicate effectively and clearly, inside large organizations or outside, even talking to the media and the press, trying to develop them as they grow up into the senior levels.”

DeArmond agrees and notes that the Soldier’s performance on the assessment will follow him or her through the Army Career Tracker system.

“I think the program is a good implementation inside of NCOES,” she said. “It’s designed from the lowest level to the top, and it’s designed to ensure that these junior Soldiers are progressing at a level equivalent to their skills. So by the time they reach the goal of becoming a command sergeant major or sergeant major, they’re able to apply themselves using the literacy and competency they need. Writing skill is one of the main tools that they’ll need to be successful.”

As the program progresses from pilot to full implementation, Montez predicts that “not only is the program going to change the students, it’s going to change the instructor prerequisites.”

“You have to have some college; you have to have some type of ability to write as cadre,” he said. “You can’t just be working with the program if your punctuation and grammar are sideways also.”

Montez and McFarlane acknowledge that the III Corps NCO Academy is fortunate to have trained and highly educated NCOs, such as DeArmond, who is about to complete her doctorate.

“Going back to education, you have to have some oversight,” Montez said. “We have Dr. DeArmond here, but [everyone will] have to have somebody with a degree who can see things, so another member of the cadre can say, ‘Hey, this is what I see. Do you see the same?’ Someone who understands that verbiage: a dangling modifier, you have a noun in between two verbs, and explain to the students which verb does it fall to. How do you hear about all that?”

McFarlane notes the need, but also sees the changes happening already.

“Back when we were young, the officer corps had all the education,” he said of himself and Montez. “They all came out of West Point or had their four-year degrees or even more. And then you had the enlisted force that pretty much had a high-school diploma or GED. They were the guys and gals who were turning the wrenches in the motorpool or cleaning the gun tubes on the tanks, executing the guidance given by the officers. And now it’s merging to the center where everybody has a whole bunch of education, the officers and the senior NCOs. … You had the blue-collar force and the white-collar element, but where are we at now? It’s some kind of light blue.”

Even after the formal education, NCOs may have some learning to do to understand the way young, junior enlisted Soldiers communicate.

McFarlane noted that many of the younger Soldiers going through BLC are more accustomed to texting than writing formally. The transition from abbreviations and emojis to scoring well on the writing assessment can be tough.

“If I have a student write a sentence into Criterion with hashtags and ‘lol,’ even though everyone understands it, the program will say the student fails,” Montez said. “The students, that’s how we’re getting them now.”

To illustrate the differences to students, Montez works to break down the process.

“Sometimes, I’ll tell them just to write something like they’re talking to me, just a normal conversation, just write. And then we’ll pick it apart,” he said. He tells them, “ ‘Give me a sentence right now, tell me something like you’re speaking to me.’ And they’ll come out there, ‘Hey, Sergeant Major, let’s keep it on the down low and go dis way and you know …’

“Meanwhile, I’m like, ‘OK, all right, write it down,’ ” he said. “I get them involved and then articulate it.”

DeArmond has worked to incorporate corrective behavior into the instruction before the students even start writing.

“Part of it is organizing,” she said. “The more organized you are in delivering the information and breaking it down step by step, the better. One idea that the deputy gave for how to write a memo is take them through the brainstorming process first. So we give them a topic, two or three students in the class will start off by brainstorming and researching what an organization or program is about.”

In this and myriad other ways, DeArmond wants to ensure that Soldiers get the most out of their time at the NCO Academy.

“When noncommissioned officers come to NCOES, this is their prime opportunity for institutional training. … They get opportunities to progress here. They get the newest information here. They learn the newest material here. This is the opportunity in NCOs’ careers when they actually get the time to solely focus on institutional training. A lot of benefits come out of this academy.

“They don’t know what is out there to help them and set them up for success,” she said. “There’s not one clear pathway for an NCO to say this is the way you succeed. So opening the doors to different opportunities is what the academy is about.”

InvictusGames_optimized

26 NCOs part of U.S. service member, veteran contingent competing at Invictus Games


By PABLO VILLA
NCO Journal

Sgt. Stefan LeRoy was on a routine patrol June 7, 2012, with a small group of cavalry scouts in Afghanistan when disaster struck.

Two of LeRoy’s fellow Soldiers — his friends — detonated a pair of improvised explosive devices. LeRoy rushed to his fallen comrades, picking one of them up to take him back to safety. In his dash to the helicopter, he stepped on another IED. LeRoy lost both of his legs, but not his indefatigable spirit.

Three months after the blast, LeRoy started cycling as a way to stay fit and motivated. His father’s love of cycling contributed heavily in his recovery.

“My dad is a big cyclist, and we were able to cycle together,” LeRoy told the Army News Service in April 2015. “He was able to do it with me, and that made me more dedicated than I would have been otherwise.”

It wasn’t long before LeRoy began competing, and succeeding, against fellow Soldiers in his newfound sport. This week, his talent is on display during the 2016 Invictus Games. Now retired, LeRoy is one of 26 U.S. Army NCOs taking part in the international Paralympic-style, multi-sport event, which allows wounded, injured or sick armed services personnel and veterans to compete.

The Invictus Games are the brainchild of Prince Harry of Wales, who was inspired to create the event after watching the 2013 U.S. Warrior Games in Colorado. The name Invictus is Latin for “Unconquered, Undefeated.” The prince’s aim was for the Games to “demonstrate the power of sport to inspire recovery, support rehabilitation and demonstrate life beyond disability.” The first edition of the Invictus Games was held Sept. 10-14, 2014, at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London.

This year’s Games are being held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Florida. Soldiers and veterans from all U.S. military branches will compete against counterparts from 14 countries in the event, which kicked off Sunday with an opening ceremony that was nationally televised on ESPN2. The network will broadcast more than 40 hours of events on its ESPN2 channel and online at ESPN3.com during the next four days. Competition concludes Thursday and the closing ceremonies will be broadcast live on ESPN2 at 7 p.m. EST.

For LeRoy, the competition is more than another hurdle in his recovery, it is a way to honor his fellow fallen Soldiers.

“In the military, we know that the strength of one comes from the strength of many,” he said in an Invictus Games video. “We never leave a fellow Soldier behind. I lost my legs in Afghanistan carrying others to safety. Now it is their memory, their courage, their sacrifice that carries me. And I will never let them down.”

NCOs at the Invictus Games

A list of Army noncommissioned officers competing with the United States team at the 2016 Invictus Games in Orlando, Florida:

Staff Sgt. Ashley Anderson: Swimming.

Retired Sgt. 1st Class Chuck Armstead: Wheelchair basketball.

Sgt. 1st Class Allan Armstrong: Swimming, track and field, cycling.

Staff Sgt. Robert Brown: Track and field.

Master Sgt. Rhoden Galloway: Swimming.

Retired Sgt. Robbie Gaupp: Track and field, sitting volleyball.

Retired Staff Sgt. Randi Gavell: Swimming and track and field.

Staff Sgt. Robert Green: Track and field.

Retired Sgt. Sean Hook: Track and field, archery, indoor rowing.

Retired Staff Sgt. Michael Kacer: Swimming, track and field, indoor rowing.

Sgt. 1st Class Katie Kuiper: Track and field, cycling.

Retired Sgt. Stefan LeRoy: Swimming, track and field.

Sgt. Ryan Major: Track and field, indoor rowing, wheelchair rugby.

Sgt. Ana Manciaz: Archery, swimming, cycling, track and field.

Staff Sgt. Elizabeth Marks: Swimming.

Retired Staff Sgt. Robert Matthews: Track and field, cycling.

Sgt. 1st Class Michael McPhall: Swimming, track and field.

Retired Staff Sgt. Billy Meeks: Archery, indoor rowing.

Sgt. Kawaiola Nahale: Swimming.

Retired Staff Sgt. Tim Payne: Swimming, track and field.

Staff Sgt. Zed Pitts: Track and field, cycling.

Retired Staff Sgt. Alexander Shaw: Indoor rowing, sitting volleyball.

Sgt. 1st Class Michael Smith: Track and field.

Retired Sgt. Monica Southall: Track and field, indoor rowing, powerlifting, wheelchair rugby.

Sgt. Aaron Stewart: Cycling, swimming.

Retired Sgt. Nicholas Titman: Swimming, track and field.

Click here to view the full ESPN broadcast schedule.

The official magazine of noncommissioned officer professional development